Yard and Garden: April 27, 2018

Y&G Blog Photo, 2018

This is the Q&A for the Yard and Garden show for April 27, 2018. Yard and Garden Live is a call-in radio show I do on KUTT 99.5 FM from 10-11:30 am and it will run through August 3, 2018. It can also be found on kutt995.com for online listening. If you missed a show or just want to read through the questions, I have written them all in my blog and will continue to do so throughout the season.

Guest Host: Dick Campbell, Owner of Campbell’s Nursery in Lincoln

1.The first caller of the show wants to plant hydrangea’s on the south side of a porch. Will they grow well in that location?

A. Most hydrangeas like part shade and wouldn’t grow as well in a location of south sun. However, ‘Limelight’ and ‘Little Lime’ would be good selections for full sun. The ‘Little Lime’ hydrangea will only grow up to 3 feet tall while ‘Limelight’ will grow up to 6-8 feet tall.

2. A walk-in listener has a 12 year old boxwood that is turning whitish-brown throughout most of the plant. What, if anything, can be done to save the plant?

A. This could be boxwood blight or winter desiccation. The fact that the boxwoods started to turn brown in the summer makes it less likely that it is winter desiccation. Also, the plant is brown and dead throughout the majority of the center of the plant, where winter desiccation typically only shows up on the top and outer sides where wind directly hits the plant. Either way, too much of the shrub has become dead branches so it should be removed. Boxwoods can be replanted into the area where the blight was a problem previously with no harm to the new plants.

3. A caller has Dwarf Alberta Spruce trees that have brown spots on them. Last summer he sprayed the plants with a copper fungicide, but should something else be done to them?

A. Dwarf Alberta spruce is prone to problems with spider mites in the summer months. If it is spider mites, when they start becoming active again, they can be killed with a strong spray of water. The bigger problem is that this is a very slow growing tree and it may never fill in again where the dead areas have appeared in the trees.

4. This caller has pecan trees that the top has died back on them over the winter. Can he prune it out and maintain the trees?

A. Give the trees time to leaf out this summer to know for sure where the dieback is found through the tree. With the cooler spring this year, many of our plants are slow to come out of their dormancy. Wait until the tree is fully out of dormancy before pruning it. After it has leafed out fully, cut the dead areas out, but cut back to a bud at the top of the tree so that you can use that bud to reestablish a new leader.

5. A caller has underground irrigation and planted a new lawn via seed and some via sod last fall. What type of watering schedule should he be on now?

A. Because this lawn was established last fall, you would not need to keep up the same schedule as last fall, the roots should be established now. Wait to start up the irrigation after spring rains begin. 1 inch of water per week would be the recommendation now, that is what established lawns require, so it would be the same for this lawn. Most often, we give our lawns 1 inch of water per week through 3 irrigation cycles of 1/3 inch each time. Make sure you check your irrigation rates when you first turn your system on for the year.

6. This caller has a 25-30 foot tall red oak in his yard. Every year for the past 2-3 years, the leaves come out cupped and small and stay that way through the entire growing season. What is wrong with his tree? He has other oaks in his yard that don’t look like this.

A. The cupping leaves sounds similar to herbicide drift. Typically, though, the trees will grow more leaves later in the season that are not cupped. If this was herbicide damage, it is likely that all the oaks in the yard would have this problem, but it still could be herbicide damage. It could also be from a small mite or other insect that is sucking the juices out of the leaves as they emerge. It would be best to bring a sample to the show or to Nicole to take to the lab for further testing. If it is herbicide damage, multiple years with damage to a tree can start to stress and kill a tree.

2018-04-20 12.52.00

Henbit blooming

7. A caller has a zoysiagrass lawn that is full of henbit for the first time this year. Is there anything to do for that now?

A. Henbit is blooming for the year now, which means it is already setting seed for more henbit to grow there next year. Henbit is a winter annual that germinates in the fall, goes dormant over the winter, then comes up in the spring and flowers and produces seed before it dies with the summer warmth. Because it is getting so late in the year and the seed is already there, there is no reason to treat for henbit now. It will die soon, once the temperatures warm up. next fall, treat with a 2,4-D product in October or November to kill it as it first germinates in the fall.

8. How do you control Creeping Charlie in the lawn?

A. Creeping Charlie is best controlled in the fall months with a 2,4-D product or a product containing Triclopyr. It is best to do 2 applications in the fall, one in the middle of September and another at the end of October. The caller was going to overseed, so it was advised to overseed this spring and then treat the Creeping Charlie in the fall for best control. It will take multiple years of treatments to fully reduce or eradicate Creeping Charlie, but spraying in the fall will start knocking it back.

9. This caller has Sod that was installed last November and now some cracks have shown up between the sections of the turf. What can be done to fix that?

A. Add some soil to those areas of bare ground and then reseed those areas. Cover the new seed with peat moss while it establishes to keep it moist.

10. A caller wants to know how to plant strawberries and what varieties are good choices?

A. Sarah Browning, Lancaster County Extension, has written a good article on Planting a Strawberry Bed

11. The last caller of the day wanted to know if they should till their garden before planting and when to prune her hydrangea shrub?

A. If the soil is loose and has a good level of nutrients, you wouldn’t have to till it first. It might be a good idea to till it first to loosen it up and to add nutrients back into the soil for better production.

As for the hydrangea, this is a late summer blooming hydrangea, so it can be pruned now and still produce flower blooms for August or September this year. It can be pruned back to the ground if it is overgrown. If it is not too overgrown, the largest canes can just be cut out of the plant, leaving the more productive, smaller canes in the plant to grow.

Advertisements

Yard and Garden: April 13, 2018

Y&G Blog Photo, 2018

This is the Q&A for the Yard and Garden show for April 13, 2018. Yard and Garden Live is a call-in radio show I do on KUTT 99.5 FM from 10-11:30 am and it will run through August 3, 2018. It can also be found on kutt995.com for online listening. If you missed a show or just want to read through the questions, I have written them all in my blog and will continue to do so throughout the season.

Guest Host: Kyle Broderick, Coordinator of the Plant & Pest Diagnostic Clinic at UNL

1.The first caller of the show wants to know when is the time to trim roses?

A. Anytime now would be good. When the show aired, snow was predicted for over the weekend, so it is advised to wait until the snow has melted before pruning the roses to avoid damage from cold weather.

This caller also has moles, how do they get rid of them in the yard?

A. Harpoon traps work best for moles. To help the trap work better, stomp down a run 2-3 times before placing the trap in the run. This shows that it is an active run and it will lead the mole to continue to pop the soil back up after you knock it down. For more information, visit the UNL Wildlife site and choose the NebGuide on Moles

2. How do you kill grass growing in peony plants

A. Fluazifop is the active ingredient found in Grass-B-Gon products. This will kill grasses and not harm ornamental plants. It can be sprayed right over peonies and iris’ and other ornamental plants. Be sure to not spray your turf or ornamental grasses with this product as it will kill any grass it contacts.

3. A woman has a substance on her artificial turf. Is it mold or moss?

A. It would be moss if it has a green color, but if it is more of a black color, it would be mold. Dry out the area to reduce the problem. You can also clean the artificial turf with a vinegar solution.

4. A caller has an apricot tree with blossoms that are starting to show color. Is there anything that can be applied to protect it from the frost, snow, and cold temperatures in the forecast for the weekend?

A. There are no sprays to protect the fruit tree from cold damage. Watering the tree prior to the cold weather can help protect it because trees use moisture to protect itself in cold weather. This is the reason that peaches and apricots have years of low production, they tend to bloom earlier than the frost free date which will cause cold temperatures to damage the developing flower buds.

This caller also wants to know if they should spray their trees for pests now or if they should apply preen in their gardens?

A. No on both of these questions. There is snow and rain in the forecast which will wash the pesticides off the trees. It is too early to use preen because it stops the germination of annual plants. Winter annual plants emerged last fall and summer annual plants won’t germinate until the soil temperatures have warmed up more. Applying preen too early in the season will cause it to break down sooner in the summer allowing later germinating summer annual plants to emerge once the preen is gone for the year. It is best to wait until soil temperatures have warmed up closer to when the seeds will germinate.

Ant mounds from YandG listener

Larger Yellow Ant Mounds

5. This walk-in listener has mounds that developed in their pasture area after they burned it this spring. What are the mounds from?

A. These mounds developed from ants. Upon closer inspection, Jim Kalisch from the UNL Entomology department, has determined the ants are Larger Yellow Ants. The mounds will persist as long as the land is not tilled. The ants favor building their nests in clumps of bunchgrass, as it provides stability and protection, and the ants tend root aphids on the bunchgrass roots underground. If the mounds are not desired, tilling the ground will reduce the mounds.

6. Can preen be used on asparagus before it emerges?

A. Yes, preen only stops the germination of annual seeds. Asparagus is a perennial plant coming back from the roots, so it will not be inhibited from growth if the preen is applied before it comes up. Make sure you are using the preen that is labeled for use in asparagus, not the general preen that is used in ornamental plantings.

7. A caller has grubs in his vegetable garden space. What should be done about that?

A. A few grubs in the garden won’t be problematic. Mostly, grubs are only damaging to potatoes and not our other vegetable plants. If the population is high enough and damage is occurring, the vegetable garden would need to be moved for a year to treat with chemicals that are not labeled for use in a vegetable garden. There are no products available to treat grubs that are labeled for use in vegetable gardens safely.

8. This caller is taking care of a planting of hostas for the first time. What does he need to do to clean up the space?

A. Hostas die back to the ground every year, so once the weather is a little warmer more regularly, these plants can be cut off at the ground level to remove all of the dead leaves and plant material from last year. Make sure to refresh the mulch to 2-3 inches deep with new organic mulch. If the plants are too big, they can be divided and replanted in other locations. Depending on the size of the plant it can be divided into 2, 3, or 4 parts to replant in other locations or to share with friends. To divide the plants, dig them up and use a spade to cut it into pieces that are then replanted.

9. A caller has white pine trees that were transplanted last year that are now turning brown on the ends of the branches. What is causing this?

A. This could be due to a combination of transplant shock and winter injury. Fall watering will help protect newly planted trees from winter injury. Water these trees well throughout the season and they should improve over time.

10. This caller has an angel wing begonia that is overwintered indoors each year. Can it be placed outside during the summer months?

A. Tropical-type plants, such as this begonia, will not take temperatures below 50 degrees F, but they can live through our summer months. Once the temperatures are consistently in the 50’s and warmer, the potted plant can be placed outside. To prevent breakage of the branches, it would be best to place the planter in a location that is protected from high winds. Next fall, before the temperatures move too cold at night, move the plant back indoors to keep it alive through the winter. Spray the plant with an insecticide before bringing indoors to keep insect pests outside instead of bringing them indoors with the plant.

11. A caller has scrub elm trees that have started growing up in the asparagus patch. What can be done to kill the elm trees?

A. Right after cutting the elm off, paint the stump with a straight 2,4-D product. Don’t use tordon or triclopyr products as these can get into the roots of the asparagus, killing it. Treat the stumps early in the season before temperatures reach 80 degrees F to avoid volatization of the product and causing possible harm to the asparagus.

12. This caller has gnats from houseplants in the office. How can they control them?

A. These are likely fungus gnats from the houseplants. If you know when the gnats first appeared and you can link that to the appearance of a new houseplant, remove that houseplant to remove the majority of the gnats. Houseplant insecticide sprays can also be used. Repotting the plants, removing the majority of the soil from the roots will also help.

13. The last caller of the day wants to know how to control grass in a well-established asparagus patch?

A. You can spray the bed with glyphosate (Roundup) before the asparagus has emerged and no green from asparagus is present, but the grass is green. It would also be best to apply mulch around the plants to reduce new weeds from emerging.

Yard and Garden: April 6, 2018

Y&G Blog Photo, 2018

This is the Q&A for the Yard and Garden show for April 6, 2018. Yard and Garden Live is a call-in radio show I do on KUTT 99.5 FM from 10-11:30 am and it will run through August 3, 2018. It can also be found on kutt995.com for online listening. If you missed a show or just want to read through the questions, I have written them all in my blog and will continue to do so throughout the season.

Guest Hosts: Jonathan Larson, Douglas/Sarpy County Extension Educator in Entomology and Jody Green, Lancaster County Extension Educator in Entomology

1.The first caller of the show has little blue flowers in her lawn. How can she get rid of them?

A. This is likely speedwell, it is a winter annual plant so it blooms very early in the spring then dies with warmer weather. At this point, since it is already blooming, just leave it as it will die soon and the seed is already set for next year. Spray it with a 2,4-D product late next fall after it has germinated or use a pre-emergent herbicide in the earlier fall before it germinates.

2. What is the correct mowing height?

A. 2.5-3.5 inches is the recommended mowing height for cool season turf in Nebraska. Too low will lead to more weed pressure and insect and disease issues because the turf cannot compete with these pests when it is too short. Make sure you mow enough to mow off only 1/3 of the turf blade each time you mow to avoid scalping the turf.

3. A caller asked if the treatments for Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) were killing the trees?

A. The most effective treatment methods for EAB are trunk injections, which can harm the tree. However, the tree can take about 10 treatments before stressing the tree to the point of death. If you are using Emamectin benzoate as the trunk injection chemical, the tree will only need to be treated every 2-3 years, giving it 20-30 years of injections before harm occurs. For the first few years of treatments, you may be able to use a soil drench rather than a trunk injection, again adding more time with your tree. A soil drench will work, but once the tree grows to 15-20 Diameter, the soil drench is not as effective. In the 20-30 years of treatments, you can get a very good start on a new tree nearby the ash tree to have a well-established tree growing in it’s place for when the ash tree needs to be removed.

Termites

Termites, Photo from the University of Nebraska Department of Entomology

4. Does wood mulch attract termites?

A. If the wood mulch is piled up so high to where the mulch is touching wood siding, it can be a pathway for the termites to enter the home. However, mulch is recommended to only be 2-3 inches deep and most concrete foundations will go higher than that. Also, if you have had termites in the past, you should be working with a pest control company for termite control and the chemicals will manage the termites from the mulch. You will not get termites from mulch, the mulch is cut up too small and termites will dry out in that condition, so that cannot happen.

5. This caller is replanting a windbreak. They have begun with an outside row of cedars and would like to know what to plant on the interior rows?

A. An interior row with multiple types of trees is best. Diversity will help your windbreak survive better if another disease or insect problem comes in to kill evergreen trees like pine wilt has. Good evergreen choices include blue spruce, black hills spruce, concolor fir, Douglas fir, ponderosa pine, white pine, and Norway spruce. You can even add in deciduous trees like oaks or maples to fill in as well.

6. A caller wants to know how to control poison hemlock on the edge of his field?

A. 2,4-D and Dicamba in a mix. This mixture is found in the product called Trimec as well as others. It is best to treat the poison hemlock while it is in the rosette stage, so early spring or fall. Do not allow cattle access to the dry matter after this has been sprayed.

7. This caller wants to know if fertilizer is needed to trees as they plant a new windbreak?

A. Fertilizer is not necessary for trees planted in Nebraska. Our soils typically have plenty of nutrients available for use by the trees. It wouldn’t hurt to add fertilizer at planting, but it isn’t necessary.

8. The final caller of the day wants to know how to plant a new asparagus patch?

A. Asparagus is a great plant for a home garden. Many people want to get plant starts from a neighbor to start their patch, but it is best to just purchase a new set of crowns. When planting asparagus crowns, dig a trench 8-12 inches deep and bury the crowns only under 2 inches of soil. As the plants poke up through the soil, add more soil until the soil is level. Avoid harvesting asparagus until the third season of growth to allow the crowns enough time for root production. For weed control, mulch is best, such as wood chips or grass clippings. Preen that is labeled for use around asparagus can be used in the spring to prevent annual weeds from germinating. In late May to early June, when finished harvesting asparagus for the year, you can break all the spears off below ground, leaving no green growth above ground, and spray glyphosate or Roundup over the bed to reduce weeds. After this, allow the plants to grow back up and produce ferns which will produce seed and help your patch grow. You can cut it back in the fall or in the spring before new growth begins.

Yard and Garden: March 30, 2018

Y&G Blog Photo, 2018

This is the Q&A for the Yard and Garden show for March 30, 2018. Yard and Garden Live is a call-in radio show I do on KUTT 99.5 FM from 10-11:30 am and it will run through August 3, 2018. It can also be found on kutt995.com for online listening. If you missed a show or just want to read through the questions, I have written them all in my blog and will continue to do so throughout the season.

Guest Host: Justin Evertson, Green Infrastructure Coordinator, Nebraska Forest Service

1.The first caller of the year has brown rot in her apricot and cherry trees. How can this be managed this spring?

A. Brown rot is a fungus that affects the fruit of stone fruit trees. Spraying with Captan or Chlorothalonil products or using an Orchard Fruit Tree Spray throughout the growing season will reduce the disease. Avoid spraying during bloom if using a combination spray that contains an insecticide to avoid damage to pollinating insects. For more information on spraying and timing, visit food.unl.edu/local-food-production and click on ‘Managing Pests in Home Fruit Plantings

2. A caller has been advised to use a type of fescue called ‘Water Saver Fescue’ because it is more drought tolerant. Would this be a good turf choice?

A. This variety is a turf-type tall fescue variety that is an RTF variety. The RTF is a new type of tall fescue that forms rhizomes, allowing it to fill in a yard rather than just form clumps like the traditional tall fescue. Turf-type tall fescues are preferred to other types of grasses because they do well in our environment and are more drought tolerant than other turf species, such as Kentucky Bluegrass. This wouldn’t be any more drought tolerant than any other turf-type tall fescue species, but it would be drought tolerant.

3. When should a person fertilize their lawn?

A. If using the maximum fertilizer applications for a year, we recommend fertilizing with the holidays: Arbor Day, Memorial Day, Labor Day, and Halloween. It is not necessary to do all of these fertilizer applications. If you leave the grass clippings on your lawn, that replaces one fertilizer application over the course of a growing season. If you only apply fertilizer one time per  year, the best time is at Halloween. If you would like to apply 2 applications per year, the other time would be to add an application on Arbor Day.

4. This caller wants to know what is best to use in a vegetable garden to keep the weeds down?

A. In a home vegetable garden, mulch is going to be best for weed control. There are a lot of mulch products that can be used in the garden to reduce weeds including: wood chips, grass clippings (that have not been treated with any pesticides), newspaper, leaves, and cardboard.

green-asparagus-pixabay5. A caller wants to plant a new asparagus bed. How should she go about planting and caring for her asparagus?

A. Asparagus is a great plant for a home garden. Many people want to get plant starts from a neighbor to start their patch, but it is best to just purchase a new set of crowns. When planting asparagus crowns, dig a trench 8-12 inches deep and bury the crowns only under 2 inches of soil. As the plants poke up through the soil, add more soil until the soil is level. Avoid harvesting asparagus until the third season of growth to allow the crowns enough time for root production. For weed control, mulch is best, the same mulches used on a vegetable garden work great for asparagus beds. Preen that is labeled for use around asparagus can be used in the spring to prevent annual weeds from germinating. In late May to early June, when finished harvesting asparagus for the year, you can break all the spears off below ground, leaving no green growth above ground, and spray glyphosate over the bed to reduce weeds.

6. This caller has Colorado Spruce trees with needles at the bottom of the tree that are turning brown. What is wrong with the tree and how can it be fixed?

A. This is likely due to needle cast disease. You can spray the tree for needle cast in May using a liquid copper fungicide. For more information, view this Nebraska Forest Service publication on Diseases of Evergreen Trees.

7. When is a good time to transplant Iris and Peonies?

A. The best time is in the fall, but it can be done now. They may not bloom this spring if you move them now, but will bloom again next year. Be sure to get the peony planted at the same depth it is now or it won’t bloom.

8. A caller has a vine growing on the trees they thought was poison oak. How can it be controlled?

A. It is likely that this is woodbine or Virginia creeper. It doesn’t all have to be killed off, it makes a great groundcover. Cut off the parts growing up the tree and leave the rest for a groundcover. If you need to manage it cut it off and treat with glyphosate or triclopyr or just hand pull.

9. The final caller of the day has recently read that trees can “communicate” to other trees if they are attacked by a pest to help the other tree prepare to defend themselves from the pest problem. Is there any research on this?

A. There is a theory that trees communicate. A German Forester is looking into this idea further. Here is the Article from the Smithsonian Magazine regarding this topic and the research on how trees communicate.

Yard and Garden: March 24, 2017

Yard & Garden for blog, 2017

This is the Q&A for the Yard and Garden show for March 24, 2017. Yard and Garden Live is a call-in radio show I do on KUTT 99.5 FM from 10-11:30 am and it will run through July 28, 2017. It can also be found on kutt995.com for online listening. If you missed a show or just want to read through the questions, I have written them all in my blog and will continue to do so throughout the season.

Guest Host: Cole Thompson, Assistant Professor of Integrated Turfgrass Management at UNL

1. The first question of the year was a caller who had 2 peach trees that were three years old when they died last year. He cut the trees off and now there is suckers coming up from the ground where those trees were. Will these trees grow and produce peaches?

A. These trees will grow and will most likely produce fruit. However, they will not be a strong growth and the peaches produced may not be the variety that he originally planted. Many of our fruit trees are grafted to a hardier rootstock. If they die back or produce suckers, that growth will be the type of tree that the roots are not the type that the scion, or top part of the graft union, was. Also, because it is from a sucker, it is not going to grow as strong and upright as the main tree. He can try to keep them going but it would be best to plant new trees as well, if he has the space for both, he can keep both the suckers and new trees. If he only had room for a couple of trees, I would suggest starting the trees over from new trees.

2015-06-25 10.19.56

*Reference to commercial products or trade names is made with the understanding that no discrimination is intended of those not mentioned and no endorsement by University of Nebraska–Lincoln Extension is implied for those mentioned.

2. This caller wanted to know what the difference is between Roundup and Roundup 365?

A. Roundup 365 contains a chemical called imazapic which gives the traditional glyphosate product more of a soil residual. The Roundup 365 is labeled only for use on and around hardscape areas such as patios, gravel paths, and driveways. The label claims that it lasts in the soil for up to 12 months, so it should not be used around trees, shrubs, or areas you plan to reseed. Regular Roundup can be used in an area around plants and where you plan to seed after the recommended wait time. You would need to be much more careful with the Roundup 365 because of the soil residual around other plants.

3. A caller has pussy willow branches that were brought indoors and placed in water to begin rooting. They have now developed roots. Can they be planted outdoors now?

A. Yes, as long as the roots have begun to form and the ground can be worked, it would be fine to plant them outdoors now.

4. When is the best time to reseed a Fescue lawn in Southeast Nebraska?

A. Fall is the best time to reseed a lawn, but it can also be done fairly effectively in the spring. It is harder in the spring due to the weeds that compete with the grass seedlings. If you plan to reseed in the spring, it is best to wait until late April to early May for that. If you seed earlier in April, increase the seeding rate to compensate for the loss due to the colder temperatures. When you seed, you can apply tenacity or a mesotrione product to the seedbed to help with weeds. Tenacity is safe for use at seeding. It is also a good idea to seed with a starter fertilizer to help get your seed started strong.

5. This caller has a birch that was cut down last fall. The remaining stump is oozing a lot of liquid right now. How do they kill the birch entirely to stop the liquid from oozing out of the stump.

A. Birch trees are one of the species of trees that tend to “Bleed” heavily in the spring if they are pruned. They have a high sap flow in the spring which will lead to the oozing of large amounts of sap through any open wounds. On a normal pruning cut to a tree with high sap flow, it is not harmful to the tree. This tree still has living roots and the wound from cutting it off is exposed so the sap still will flow through. This tree either needs to be treated with chemicals to kill it or the stump needs to be ground out to stop this sap flow and to be able to plant new plants in the area. You can drill new holes into the tree and apply 2,4-D to those holes to start to kill the tree. With chemicals, it will take a few years to fully kill the stump.

6. Can raspberries be transplanted now?

A. Yes, raspberries should be planted as early as the ground can be worked in the spring, so now would be fine. It is best if the soil was prepared last year by spraying all the weeds and incorporating organic matter. This will help to ensure you have a raspberry planting to last many years.

2016-11-22 16.59.14.jpg

7. A caller planted grass last fall and held the seed to the seedbed with a biodegradable plastic barrier designed for seeding turf. However, now the plastic is not breaking down and it is getting stuck in the lawnmower. Is there anything they can do to break it down quicker? It will disturb the lawn too much to try to pull it out now.

A. Pulling it out without disturbing the lawn would be the quickest, but if that is not safe to do without tearing up the lawn, that isn’t the best option. Try to water it down or hope for rain, the moisture may help to break it down faster than it sitting dry. This winter was quite dry which may have delayed the breaking down process.

8. This caller had a giant tree fall in his yard. He has removed most of the tree but about 5 feet of the trunk is still standing in the yard. What can he do with the stump?

A. It would be best to cut that trunk off at the ground level and grind the stump out so that you can replant either with turf or with a new tree. If you don’t want to grind it out now or replant, you can cut it down to the ground level and place soil over it to allow it to naturally break down under the soil.

9. A caller has been growing watermelons but they tend to wither and die early in the year. What is wrong and how can he improve his crop?

A. It sounds like this caller has squash vine borers that get into his vines in the summer months. Squash vine borer is a type of moth larvae that gets into the stem of the vines and blocks the movement of water and nutrients through the plant. They are very common in melons, squash, cucumbers, and pumpkins. To avoid the damage from this insect, use a spray or dust formulation of sevin or eight on the base of the plant regularly through the growing season starting in June. You can also use aluminum foil or a toilet paper tube around the base of the plant to act as a barrier between the plant and the female squash vine borer adult who is trying to lay her eggs on the plant.

10. This caller has 25 bur oak trees that were planted 4 feet apart with the idea that some would die to space them out further. Most did not die and are still planted too closely. Will they grow that close together or should some be removed?

A. Bur oaks grow quite large, but in a forested area they will grow fairly close together. They will grow this closely together, however it will shade out many of the branches and it will cause conditions that are conducive to diseases when trees don’t have the space to have good airflow. It would be best to remove some of the trees so that the trees left behind are given 20 feet or more between them. They are only 10-12 feet tall at this time so they would still be fine to be spaded out and transplanted to another location if you can find someone to spade them and someone to plant them somewhere else.

11. Is it too early to plant onions? Is it time to cut back mums that are left from last fall?

A. Late March to early April is the best time to plant onions. Wait to cut back perennials from last fall. The dead plant material will protect them from freezing temperatures for another week or two. The plant material can be removed in the beginning to the middle of April.

12. This caller has a yard with high dog traffic. What type of grass would be best to stay growing through the dog traffic?

A. High traffic lawns will decline. Increasing the fertility will improve growth in this area. Also, if you could limit the traffic patterns from time to time through the lawn, this would help as well. Kentucky Bluegrass will recover better in high traffic areas.

13. A caller has a bean field area that he is trying to turn back to a grass area. What type of grass would do good in this area for an non-irrigated recreational area on an acreage?

A. Buffalograss would be great for an acreage area. Once it becomes established it wouldn’t have to be irrigated much or mowed at all. It is a very low maintenance grass species that is native and you can choose many different newer varieties. UNL has good seed selections. Because this was a bean field it might be over-tilled so a roller may be necessary to firm the soil up before planting. Buffalograss is a warm season grass so it should be seeded May 1st.

14. The final caller of the day has an established cedar windbreak. Some of the trees were removed recently and there is a bare area in the nearby trees where they were shaded out from the removed trees. This area is only 7 feet from the house. What can be planted in place of these trees to help block the bare area in the windbreak?

A. Because this is so close to the house, don’t go with anything too big. A larger shrub may be a good choice such as a viburnum, serviceberry, some dogwoods or even some lilacs may help fill in. Some slender growing trees may also work, but full size trees may grow into the house.