Yard and Garden: March 24, 2017

Yard & Garden for blog, 2017

This is the Q&A for the Yard and Garden show for March 24, 2017. Yard and Garden Live is a call-in radio show I do on KUTT 99.5 FM from 10-11:30 am and it will run through July 28, 2017. It can also be found on kutt995.com for online listening. If you missed a show or just want to read through the questions, I have written them all in my blog and will continue to do so throughout the season.

Guest Host: Cole Thompson, Assistant Professor of Integrated Turfgrass Management at UNL

1. The first question of the year was a caller who had 2 peach trees that were three years old when they died last year. He cut the trees off and now there is suckers coming up from the ground where those trees were. Will these trees grow and produce peaches?

A. These trees will grow and will most likely produce fruit. However, they will not be a strong growth and the peaches produced may not be the variety that he originally planted. Many of our fruit trees are grafted to a hardier rootstock. If they die back or produce suckers, that growth will be the type of tree that the roots are not the type that the scion, or top part of the graft union, was. Also, because it is from a sucker, it is not going to grow as strong and upright as the main tree. He can try to keep them going but it would be best to plant new trees as well, if he has the space for both, he can keep both the suckers and new trees. If he only had room for a couple of trees, I would suggest starting the trees over from new trees.

2015-06-25 10.19.56

*Reference to commercial products or trade names is made with the understanding that no discrimination is intended of those not mentioned and no endorsement by University of Nebraska–Lincoln Extension is implied for those mentioned.

2. This caller wanted to know what the difference is between Roundup and Roundup 365?

A. Roundup 365 contains a chemical called imazapic which gives the traditional glyphosate product more of a soil residual. The Roundup 365 is labeled only for use on and around hardscape areas such as patios, gravel paths, and driveways. The label claims that it lasts in the soil for up to 12 months, so it should not be used around trees, shrubs, or areas you plan to reseed. Regular Roundup can be used in an area around plants and where you plan to seed after the recommended wait time. You would need to be much more careful with the Roundup 365 because of the soil residual around other plants.

3. A caller has pussy willow branches that were brought indoors and placed in water to begin rooting. They have now developed roots. Can they be planted outdoors now?

A. Yes, as long as the roots have begun to form and the ground can be worked, it would be fine to plant them outdoors now.

4. When is the best time to reseed a Fescue lawn in Southeast Nebraska?

A. Fall is the best time to reseed a lawn, but it can also be done fairly effectively in the spring. It is harder in the spring due to the weeds that compete with the grass seedlings. If you plan to reseed in the spring, it is best to wait until late April to early May for that. If you seed earlier in April, increase the seeding rate to compensate for the loss due to the colder temperatures. When you seed, you can apply tenacity or a mesotrione product to the seedbed to help with weeds. Tenacity is safe for use at seeding. It is also a good idea to seed with a starter fertilizer to help get your seed started strong.

5. This caller has a birch that was cut down last fall. The remaining stump is oozing a lot of liquid right now. How do they kill the birch entirely to stop the liquid from oozing out of the stump.

A. Birch trees are one of the species of trees that tend to “Bleed” heavily in the spring if they are pruned. They have a high sap flow in the spring which will lead to the oozing of large amounts of sap through any open wounds. On a normal pruning cut to a tree with high sap flow, it is not harmful to the tree. This tree still has living roots and the wound from cutting it off is exposed so the sap still will flow through. This tree either needs to be treated with chemicals to kill it or the stump needs to be ground out to stop this sap flow and to be able to plant new plants in the area. You can drill new holes into the tree and apply 2,4-D to those holes to start to kill the tree. With chemicals, it will take a few years to fully kill the stump.

6. Can raspberries be transplanted now?

A. Yes, raspberries should be planted as early as the ground can be worked in the spring, so now would be fine. It is best if the soil was prepared last year by spraying all the weeds and incorporating organic matter. This will help to ensure you have a raspberry planting to last many years.

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7. A caller planted grass last fall and held the seed to the seedbed with a biodegradable plastic barrier designed for seeding turf. However, now the plastic is not breaking down and it is getting stuck in the lawnmower. Is there anything they can do to break it down quicker? It will disturb the lawn too much to try to pull it out now.

A. Pulling it out without disturbing the lawn would be the quickest, but if that is not safe to do without tearing up the lawn, that isn’t the best option. Try to water it down or hope for rain, the moisture may help to break it down faster than it sitting dry. This winter was quite dry which may have delayed the breaking down process.

8. This caller had a giant tree fall in his yard. He has removed most of the tree but about 5 feet of the trunk is still standing in the yard. What can he do with the stump?

A. It would be best to cut that trunk off at the ground level and grind the stump out so that you can replant either with turf or with a new tree. If you don’t want to grind it out now or replant, you can cut it down to the ground level and place soil over it to allow it to naturally break down under the soil.

9. A caller has been growing watermelons but they tend to wither and die early in the year. What is wrong and how can he improve his crop?

A. It sounds like this caller has squash vine borers that get into his vines in the summer months. Squash vine borer is a type of moth larvae that gets into the stem of the vines and blocks the movement of water and nutrients through the plant. They are very common in melons, squash, cucumbers, and pumpkins. To avoid the damage from this insect, use a spray or dust formulation of sevin or eight on the base of the plant regularly through the growing season starting in June. You can also use aluminum foil or a toilet paper tube around the base of the plant to act as a barrier between the plant and the female squash vine borer adult who is trying to lay her eggs on the plant.

10. This caller has 25 bur oak trees that were planted 4 feet apart with the idea that some would die to space them out further. Most did not die and are still planted too closely. Will they grow that close together or should some be removed?

A. Bur oaks grow quite large, but in a forested area they will grow fairly close together. They will grow this closely together, however it will shade out many of the branches and it will cause conditions that are conducive to diseases when trees don’t have the space to have good airflow. It would be best to remove some of the trees so that the trees left behind are given 20 feet or more between them. They are only 10-12 feet tall at this time so they would still be fine to be spaded out and transplanted to another location if you can find someone to spade them and someone to plant them somewhere else.

11. Is it too early to plant onions? Is it time to cut back mums that are left from last fall?

A. Late March to early April is the best time to plant onions. Wait to cut back perennials from last fall. The dead plant material will protect them from freezing temperatures for another week or two. The plant material can be removed in the beginning to the middle of April.

12. This caller has a yard with high dog traffic. What type of grass would be best to stay growing through the dog traffic?

A. High traffic lawns will decline. Increasing the fertility will improve growth in this area. Also, if you could limit the traffic patterns from time to time through the lawn, this would help as well. Kentucky Bluegrass will recover better in high traffic areas.

13. A caller has a bean field area that he is trying to turn back to a grass area. What type of grass would do good in this area for an non-irrigated recreational area on an acreage?

A. Buffalograss would be great for an acreage area. Once it becomes established it wouldn’t have to be irrigated much or mowed at all. It is a very low maintenance grass species that is native and you can choose many different newer varieties. UNL has good seed selections. Because this was a bean field it might be over-tilled so a roller may be necessary to firm the soil up before planting. Buffalograss is a warm season grass so it should be seeded May 1st.

14. The final caller of the day has an established cedar windbreak. Some of the trees were removed recently and there is a bare area in the nearby trees where they were shaded out from the removed trees. This area is only 7 feet from the house. What can be planted in place of these trees to help block the bare area in the windbreak?

A. Because this is so close to the house, don’t go with anything too big. A larger shrub may be a good choice such as a viburnum, serviceberry, some dogwoods or even some lilacs may help fill in. Some slender growing trees may also work, but full size trees may grow into the house.

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Fall…Plant a Tree, Clean up the Garden

fall-tree-planting-blog-post

Fall is a great time of the year. The heat and humidity has finally been reduced and we can enjoy going back outdoors again. It is a great time of the year for planting to get things in the ground before it freezes and we can start doing other chores in our landscape to keep it looking beautiful throughout the winter months.

Fall is a great time to plant a new tree in your landscape to add fall interest to your yard. When choosing a tree and location in your yard, the first thing to consider is overhead and underground utilities, future construction sites, and the mature size of the plant.  Large trees should be planted a minimum of 15 to 20 feet away from buildings and a minimum of 20 to 25 feet from overhead power lines.  Purchasing a three to six foot tree usually saves money, gets the tree started faster and will outgrow more expensive, larger alternatives.

Health and longevity of the tree starts with good planting practices. First, remove the tree from the container and remove all wraps and ropes around the rootball, including the burlap. Next, shake off the excess soil and find the main rootball. The area where the lateral roots begin should be just below the soil surface. After you have determined the actual size of the rootball, dig a hole twice as wide and only as deep as the roots. Backfill into the hole with the soil that was removed when digging the hole to avoid creating a wall that roots cannot penetrate from one soil type to another. Add a mulch ring to all trees. The ring should be 2-3 inches deep and at least 2-3 feet wide around the tree. The tree can be staked if in a windswept location but the staking equipment should only be left on for one growing season.

With the threat of Emerald Ash borer now in Nebraska, this fall would be a good time to plant a tree as a replacement for an ash in your yard. With Emerald Ash Borer still only in the Omaha area, this portion of Southeast Nebraska doesn’t need to do anything for treatments or removal of ash trees yet. Treatments should not be done until Emerald Ash Borer is found within 15 miles of your tree. However, if you have decided that your ash tree is not in the condition to treat or you don’t want to spend the money to treat it annually, a replacement tree is the next best option. If you start a new tree nearby now, by the time EAB gets here and we have to remove trees, you will already have one started with a good amount of shade provided.

pruning tools-K. Todd

Pruning Tools Photo courtesy of Kim Todd, UNL Department of Agronomy and Horticulture

Fall is also a great time to get out and clean up our landscape beds. Replenish the mulch around the plants and remove the leaves of herbaceous perennials once they have turned brown in the fall. It is vital to wait until those leaves turn brown in the fall because while they are still green, they are still taking nutrients back into the roots of the plant that will help kick start the plant early in the spring. Wait until spring to cut back roses and butterfly bushes. These plants have a hollow stem and can have more winter dieback if they are pruned in the fall. Don’t prune any spring flowering shrub in the fall or you will be pruning off the flower buds for next spring. Wait until the trees are dormant before pruning them in the fall. If pruned too early, new growth can occur which will be more vulnerable to dieback in freezing temperatures.

Yard and Garden: July 1, 2016

Yard & Garden for blog

This is the Q&A for the Yard and Garden show for July 1, 2016. Yard and Garden Live is a call-in radio show I do on KUTT 99.5 FM from 10-11:30 am and it will run through August 5, 2016. It can also be found on kutt995.com for online listening. If you missed a show or just want to read through the questions, I have written them all in my blog and will continue to do so throughout the season.

Guest Host: Bob Henrickson, Assistant Director of the Nebraska Statewide Arboretum

1. The first caller of the day wants to use weed fabric and white rocks around the foundation of his house. Is this a good idea?

A. This can be done, but as horticulturists, Bob and I are always for more greenspace and less rocks. The weed fabric will work for a short time but often weeds will germinate through or on top of the fabric and it is hard to remove or change after the fabric is in. A good option would be to plant shrubs and perennials in there to help hide the foundation to the siding. Wood chip mulches will help with weed control around the plants.

2. A caller has a problem with ground squirrels in their lawn.

A. a trap can be built to control ground squirrels. The Internet Center for Wildlife Damage Management has a good guide for 13-lined ground squirrels.

3. A caller has bees in their sand play area. What can be done about it?

A. The best control for this would be to cover the sandbox so the bees cannot burrow into the sand to build their nest. If this can’t be done, you can sprinkle a little sevin in the holes where the bees go to nest. This is not the best option if you have kids playing in the sand because the chemical would not be safe for that. Otherwise, spraying the sandbox with water or soapy water will deter and possibly kill the bees.

4. This caller has a bald cypress tree that had lacebugs last spring. This year it hasn’t leafed out on the branches, most of the leaves are on the trunk. What can be done for this tree?

A. Removal and replacement. When a tree only leafs out on the trunk there is some reason that the flow of water and nutrients is not going through the whole tree. This could be due to borers or some type of root issue. Even with trees that are 8 years old, they could have had a root injury or been planted too deeply or had a stem girdling root that is now causing death of the tree. There is no cure for this at this point in the trees life.

5. A caller has a new lawn that they are trying to rejuvenate. What would the process be?

A. They are watering 2 times a week with a sprinkler for a couple of hours at a time, this should be sufficient. Stick with what you have been doing and don’t abruptly reduce it. Fertilize with the holidays: Arbor Day, Memorial Day, Labor Day, Halloween. So at this point don’t fertilize until the fall. Fertilizing in hot weather can cause more stress or leaf burn. For weed control, use crabgrass pre-emergent in the spring with the Arbor Day fertilization and use 2,4-D in the fall.

6. What to do when planting a tree that is badly rootbound?

A. It is hard to fix a tree when the roots are already rootbound. Once they begin to grow in a circular pattern, they will continue to do that for life, and damage doesn’t always show up until the tree is 10-15 years old. It is best to look at the roots before purchasing to choose a smaller tree with healthy roots. Also, when you get it home, remove the excess topsoil from the top of the rootball to ensure that it gets planted at the correct depth.

7. An email question came in to ask what to do for stump removal where they cut down and removed some shrubs?

A. Keep cutting the suckers off as they regrow and mulch the area if you just want to be rid of the plants. If you want to replant into the area, you will have to remove the stumps by digging them out or using a stump grinder to grind them out. Do not use Tordon in this area as it is against label regulations and it will not speed up the process and it can kill other desirable plants.

8. A caller has a firethorn plant with spidermites that they see on the plant every year and it causes them to loose many leaves each year. What can be done for them?

A. A strong stream of water will often work for spidermites. If the population is too high you will have to use insecticidal soaps. If this is an annual occurrence you may want to remove these shrubs and replace them with something that isn’t so problematic in this area.

9. What do you do for sandburs?

A. Sandburs are an annual grass, so crabgrass pre-emergent herbicides in the spring will help reduce the population by stopping germination. At this point in the year you can use a post-emergent grass herbicide such as Drive. Keep the area mowed to reduce the seed production for next year.

10. A caller has honeysuckle that is now invasive through his yard. What can be done to eliminate the honeysuckle plants? Also, is hickory a good tree for Nebraska? Why don’t we see hickory trees planted more?

A. Continual cutting of the honeysuckle will eventually kill it. You may want to try to dig up the plant to help reduce the problem. You can also treat the stump with roundup and/or 2,4-D. Use 2,4-D products in the spring or fall, it is now too hot to use this product without possible damage to desirable plants. Hickory is a great tree for Nebraska, it is just underutilized. Good hickory tree choices for Nebraska include Shagbark Hickory, Bitternut, and King Nut. Shagbark Hickory was the Great Plants of the Great Plains Tree of the Year Selection in 2011.

 

Japanese Beetle, 7-16 Acreage

Japanese Beetle adult on the left and immature on the right. Photos by Jim Kalisch, UNL Entomology.

11. A walk-in listener brought in a green beetle to be identified.

A. This is a Japanese Beetle. It is identified by the green metallic color, gold elytra, and white spots along the sides of the abdomen. This is an invasive insect from Japan that feeds on over 300 species of trees and shrubs, it favors roses and plants in the rose family. It will cause a skeletonization of the leaves as the adult feeds. As immatures they are a white grub that feeds on the roots of our turf. Management of white grubs in the turf will reduce the population. As adults, they can be controlled with general insecticides such as sevin, eight, bifenthrin, malation, or others. Don’t use insecticides on the flowers or flower buds to help with pollinator populations.

12. The final question of the day was from an email asking what chemicals do you use for bagworms?

A. Bagworms can be controlled with Bt, spinosad, sevin, eight, malathion, or tempo. The treatments need to be completed before the bags are smaller than 1/2 inch in length. You can also remove bags as they are seen and throw them into a bucket of soapy water to kill them without pesticides if you can reach them all.

Yard and Garden: May 27, 2016

Yard & Garden for blog

This is the Q&A for the Yard and Garden show for May 27, 2016. Yard and Garden Live is a call-in radio show I do on KUTT 99.5 FM from 10-11:30 am and it will run through August 5, 2016. It can also be found on kutt995.com for online listening. If you missed a show or just want to read through the questions, I have written them all in my blog and will continue to do so throughout the season.

Guest Host: Dick Campbell, Owner of Campbell’s Nursery in Lincoln

1. The first question of the day came via email. A listener wanted to know how to control clover in their lawn?

A. Clover is best managed in the fall months when it is pulling nutrients from the leaves into the roots, it will take the chemical into the roots as well. Products with triclopyr work best, but 2,4-D will work as well. Make 2-3 applications in September and October for best control.

Mallow, Phil Westra, Co State Univ, Bugwood

Common Mallow photo by Phil Westra, Colorado State University, Bugwood.org

2. A walk-in question was for identification of a weed.

A. This weed is mallow. It is a difficult weed that will move throughout our gardens. It can be controlled with a careful application of Glyphosate (Roundup). Be careful not to spray any other plants with the glyphosate product.

3. A caller wanted to know when she can transplant daylilies and Iris?

A. The daylily could be transplanted now. It would be best to move these in the spring or in the fall, but daylilies are a tough plant and would be fine if moved now as long as they are kept well watered when it is hot because the root system isn’t developed at the new location yet. Iris would be best if transplanted in the fall.

4. A caller has earthworms making his lawn uneven. What can be done to control those?  This caller also wanted to know if he can water houseplants with water that goes through a water softener?

A. Earthworms are very beneficial to our soils as they reduce compaction and add organic matter back to our soils. The damage from them is only seen for a couple of weeks in the spring with rains. If you can deal with it for a short time, it is best to avoid treating for them. If you have to treat, Sevin insecticide does have some management capabilities for your lawn. As for watering the houseplants with water from a water softener, it is best to use water prior to the softener due to the increase of salts in the water.

5. This caller wants to know how far away from the house a shade plant should be planted? She also wants to know how she can manage grass in Iris’?

A. Spacing the tree from the house depends on the tree chosen and what the full size of that tree is. For many of the oak or maple shade trees, it is best to go 25-35 feet or farther from the house to ensure no problems develop as the tree grows. The grass in the Iris bed can be controlled with Grass-B-Gon.

6. A caller has a cherry tree that the top broke off but it is still attached to the main trunk. Can it be saved?

A. There is no way to re-attach a broken off branch. This branch will have to be removed. Because this is the only branch that is still producing leaves and cherries, the tree should be removed and replaced.

7. A caller has 2 rhubarb patches that were damaged badly by hail. The leaves look terrible. Should those leaves be removed or left on the plant?

A. If there are new leaves growing below the damaged leaves, the damaged leaves can be removed. However, if those damaged leaves are all that is alive on the plant right now, they should be left on the plant until new leaves begin to grow so that the plant can still grow and build nutrients for next spring.

8. A sample was brought in of a trumpet vine with many little insect all over the stem, leaves, and flowers. The plant has been sprayed with Sevin with no control. What can be done for this trumpet vine?

A. Sevin is not an effective method of control for aphids. In high populations you can use Eight or Malathion. Aphids are not very damaging to our plants and they are fairly short lived. Given time, predatory insects will move onto the aphids to control them without chemicals.

9. This caller was looking into planting apple trees and found there is a disease called cedar-apple rust. Is this a concerning disease here and what should be done to avoid problems with it?

A. Yes, cedar-apple rust is a damaging problem for apple trees. The spores can spread up to 2 miles, so it is best to plant a resistant apple tree cultivar. It is also good to look for cultivars that are resistant to apple scab. For choosing your cultivar, here is a publication from Purdue that lists common apple tree varieties and their disease susceptibility: Disease Susceptibility of Common Apple Cultivars

10. A sample was brought in of a tulip tree with leaves that are puckered and rolled downward. What would be the problem with this tree?

A. This tree has aphids on the underside of the leaves that are sucking the juices out of the leaves. Aphids are not terribly damaging to our plants and are fairly short lived. In high populations you can use Eight or Malathion.

11. Is there a dry granular weed killer for the lawn? When is the time to move gooseberries, iris, peonies, and rhubarb?

A. Fertilome is a good dry, granular weed killer. This is best applied early in the morning so it will stick to the leaf blades with the morning dew. Gooseberries should be moved after dormancy. Iris and peonies should be moved in the fall, typically in September when the tops begin to turn yellow. The rhubarb should be moved after they are dormant in the fall or early spring.

12. This caller has asparagus that has been planted in this location for many years and is now dying out. She fertilizes 2-3 times per year with a general fertilizer. What is causing this problem and can it be fixed? She also wants to know if she can use canning salt or Epsom salt in her garden? And, finally, she wants to know what to do for the aphids on her honeysuckle?

A. Asparagus will die out due to age. It would be beneficial to dig it up this fall after it goes dormant and divide the plants to replant as individual clumps. When replanting, sprinkle some bone meal in the hole to help with fertility. As for using epsom salt in the garden, this is not necessary. Epsom salt is magnesium sulfate which is in good supply in Nebraska soils. If nutrients are necessary in your garden, it is best to use a general purpose fertilizer. Canning salt can harm your plants and damage the soil. It is not a recommended practice to use any type of salt in your garden. As for the honeysuckle aphids, those should be controlled with Eight or Malathion. The aphids on honeysuckle can cause witches broom to the plant so they should be controlled.

13. Do raspberries and blackberries need to be grown on a trellis?

A. Yes, a trellis or an espalier would be a good way to grow them. Here is a good guide to growing raspberries and blackberries from Missouri Extension

14. Can red and black raspberries be planted together?

A. Don’t plant them within 20 feet of each other or they will cross pollinate and the fruits will not taste as good.

15. A caller has rhubarb that is shooting up stalks with seeds on them. What should be done with those?

A. Those seed stalks should be removed. Cut the stalk off at the ground. If left the plant will put energy into producing seed that should be stored for leaf and stalk production.

16. The last caller of the day has a mandevilla plant that is growing outdoors in a pot with a trellis. The leaves are now turning yellow and black. What is causing this and how can it be managed?

A. This is a moisture issue. The heavy rains this year are causing a leaf fungus to occur. A rose and flower systemic containing a fungicide can be applied to the plant to help reduce the disease.

Arbor Day, Plant a Tree

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Arbor Day is April 24, 2015. To show support for Arbor Day, we should all go out and plant at least one tree. If you don’t have room for one in your yard, trees can be donated to parks and schools or you can go to the Arbor Day Foundation and donate a tree to be planted in one of our Nation’s forests. Nebraska didn’t always have as many trees in it as it does today, so take some time on Arbor Day to plant a tree to ensure that we have trees for years to come.

Deciding what tree to plant is half of the battle when planting a tree. There are so many great tree selections that will grow very well in our Nebraska Environment. ReTree Nebraska is an affiliate of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln that focuses on “raising public awareness of the value of trees and reverse the decline and improve the sustainability of community trees and forests”. ReTree has been working on a list of great trees for Nebraska, each year adding more trees to that list. The list for 2015 includes Hackberry, Sycamore, Baldcypress, Catalpa, Kentucky Coffeetree, Elm Hybrids, Hackberry, Sugar and Bigtooth Maple, Chinkapin Oak, Bur Oak, English Oak, Shantung Maple, Miyabe Maple, Gambel Oak, Tree Lilac, Concolor Fir, Black Hills Spruce, and Ponderosa Pine. Any of these would be great choices for your yard, but diversity is the key when planting trees. The 2 trees added to the list for 2015 were Hackberry and Sycamore.

Image Courtesy of Steven Katovich, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org

Hackberry Tree Image Courtesy of Steven Katovich, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org

Hackberry is a great tree for Nebraska because it is regionally native and adapted to our ever-changing Nebraska environment. The leaves have an uneven base and typically are found with a gall on the leaves due to the Hackberry psyllid. These galls are not harmful to the tree, they are just an aesthetic nuisance. It is a great tree for pollinators as well.

Image Courtesy of Richard Webb, Self-employed horticulurist, Bugwood.org

Sycamore Bark Image Courtesy of Richard Webb, Self-employed horticulurist, Bugwood.org

Sycamore is another great tree. Sycamore trees grow very large, up to 100 feet tall with a massive trunk. The leaves on a sycamore tree are tri-lobed and are 4-10 inches long and slightly wider than they are long. Sycamore trees have unique camouflage bark that opens up to a white base.

Another very important factor that you need to keep in mind when planting trees, would include how to plant a tree correctly to ensure healthy growth. First of all, remove all of the burlap and any other materials from the root ball before planting. Be sure to also remove any tags, twine, or wire from the tree. Remember to remove all the grass and weeds that are within the area you will be planting the tree. Dig a hole that is 2-3 times wider and no deeper than the root ball and loosen up the sides of the hole. Plant the tree so that root flare is at the soil surface. Do not amend the soil that is in the hole, backfill with the existing soil. Make sure that the entire root ball is covered with soil to avoid drying out. Add a mulch ring at least two to three feet out from the base of the tree and only 2-3 inches deep.

Staking a tree is not a mandatory practice. If you do have to stake the tree due to high winds, make sure that the tree has plenty of movement to allow it to build stronger roots. Also be sure that the staking material is removed after the first year to avoid the tree being damaged by the staking materials.

Tree Planting: Happy Arbor Day, April 25th

2013-05-09 10.12.49The last Friday in April is Arbor Day. This year that holiday falls on April 25th. In support of this holiday we should all go out and plant a tree or more than one if you desire, or support an organization that does plant trees if you have no need or space for extra trees in your yard.

When planting trees, utilize diversity. Diversity is planting many different types of trees in an area so that if any new disease or insect comes, it doesn’t wipe out all of our trees. The lack of diversity has been a problem recently with pine wilt in Nebraska. Entire windbreaks are being destroyed in a matter of a couple of years due to pine wilt. Just make sure that whatever tree you choose, is resistant to many of the common diseases we see in Nebraska such as Pine wilt.

Planting a tree correctly initially will ensure its success.  Here are the steps to planting a tree correctly:

  • Pick a good location
    • Plant your tree away from buildings and other plants
    • Allow it to grow into the location
  • Dig a hole that is 2-3 times wider than the root ball and only as deep as the root ball
  • Loosen up the sides of the hole
  • Before planting the tree, remove the burlap and wire basket
  • Be sure to also remove any tags, twine, or wire from the tree
  • Do not amend the soil that covers the root ball after it is placed into the hole
  • Plant the tree so that root flare is at the soil surface
  • Install a mulch ring around the tree
    • At least two to three feet out from the base of the tree
    • Only 2-3 inches deep
  • Staking a tree is not a mandatory practice, if you do have to stake the tree due to high winds, make sure that the tree has plenty of movement within the stakes
    • Also be sure that the staking material is removed after the first year to avoid the tree being damaged by the staking materials.
This is a very nicely installed mulch ring!

This is a very nicely installed mulch ring!

One problem that you might notice now in your landscape, after the winter, is deer damage to your trees and shrubs. Deer can do a lot of damage to a tree over the fall and winter months, especially to a smaller or younger tree. Many bucks will rub on trees later in the fall to remove the velvet from their antlers, which can leave a canker or open area on the tree. They can also do damage to our trees and shrubs when they feed on the buds, leaves, and stems of many different ornamental plants. These twigs are going to have a jagged or torn appearance to them due to the way the deer feed on the plants. Typically the damage from deer to a tree can heal, but it will be a location in the tree or shrub where diseases and insects can enter the plant.

My beautiful picture

If you notice deer damage to your plants, there is nothing you can do for the tree after the damage has already happened. However, depending on the severity, your tree will probably survive after being damaged by deer. You can help reduce the problem in the future by utilizing an electric fence around your property to keep deer out of your lawn, or by putting up a 4 foot tall fence around each tree in your landscape. Remember to protect any newly planted tree from deer when planting.