Yard and Garden: July 6, 2018

Y&G Blog Photo, 2018

This is the Q&A for the Yard and Garden show for July 6, 2018. Yard and Garden Live is a call-in radio show I do on KUTT 99.5 FM from 10-11:30 am and it will run through August 3, 2018. It can also be found on kutt995.com for online listening. If you missed a show or just want to read through the questions, I have written them all in my blog and will continue to do so throughout the season.

Guest Host: Dennis Ferraro, Wildlife Specialist from UNL

1. The first caller of the day wants to know if borers from ash trees can get into his walnut trees?

A. Some native borers can be a problem in both ash and walnut trees, such as the redheaded ash borer which is a common borer in many of our trees in Nebraska. When the Emerald Ash Borer gets to southeast Nebraska, it will not be able to. EAB is a pest in Ash trees only.

He also wanted to know how to move woodchucks and not kill them?

A. Live trapping will work for woodchucks. Use cucumbers or corn to bait them and wire the trap open for a few days before actually activating the trap because woodchucks are very cautious and will not be trapped the first time or 2 into the trap. The woodchuck can then be relocated to within 100 yards of the trapped location. State regulations prohibit relocation farther than 100 yards. It would also work to change their nesting location. This woodchuck is found under a building, so if you can chase it out during the day then pack the hole tightly with road gravel will prevent them from coming back. For more information, visit the UNL Wildlife website on Woodchucks.

2. A caller has heard that bull snakes will keep rattle snakes away. Is this true?

A. These 2 types of snakes do get along but bull snakes are more aggressive hunters and can out-compete rattle snakes. Because of this, rattle snakes usually relocate to find food.

3. This caller has tomatoes with bumps along the stem of the plant. What is wrong with the plant?

A. There is nothing wrong with tomatoes that develop bumps along the stem. These are aerial roots which are common.

4. A caller has a white powdery substance on her peony plants. What causes this and how can it be controlled?

A. This is most likely powdery mildew on the peony plants. It is a common disease we see this time of the year. There is no need to treat the plants for it right now. The best control for powdery mildew is to cut off the plant in the fall when it dies back and destroy the infested plant material so the disease cannot overwinter. It will not kill the plants.

5. This caller has tomato plants with leaves that are turning yellow and the plant is not producing tomatoes, any flowers produced fall off. What is wrong with his tomato plant?

A. This is likely due to environmental stress or possibly Septoria leaf spot. Make sure that the plants are watered 1 inch of water per week, they have mulch, and they are being watered from below. If desired, a fungicide can be applied. For more information view this NebGuide on Leaf and Fruit Diseases of Tomatoes. The poor pollination is common this year due to the heat. Give the plants some time and they should start to produce.

6. A caller has a sycamore tree that is shedding bark. What is wrong with the tree?

A. It is normal for sycamore trees to lose some bark. It is a tree that has a camouflage bark appearance due to the fact that it sheds some bark. Nothing to worry about or to do to fix it.

7. This caller is growing petunias in a hanging basket and the leaves are turning yellow. What is wrong with them?

A. This could be due to environmental stress. Make sure they are kept watered and placed in a location where they get full sun. It might also be from spidermites, look closely at the plant to see if there is any very fine webbing. If so, use a strong spray of water to knock the spidermites off and kill them.

8. A caller has bindweed in his garden and in his lawn. What can be done to control it?

A. In the garden, use the “glove of death” which is when you wear a chemical-resistant glove and then put a cloth glove over that. Then, dip a few fingers of the gloved hand into Glyphosate and rub those fingers along the stem and leaves of the bindweed to kill it. Basically, the idea is to keep it from flowering and producing more seed, hand pulling will help keep new seed from being deposited into the garden which can be viable for up to 60 years. In the fall, you can spray the lawn with a 2,4-D product.

9. How do you control purslane in the garden?

A. Purslane easily reproduces from cuttings so avoid hoeing or weed trimming through it while leaving pieces of the plant laying around on the ground throughout the garden. Purslane doesn’t like to be smothered, so a heavy mulch layer on the weed will help.

Gorgone Checkerspot Caterpillar

Gorgone Checkerspot Caterpillar

10. This caller has tiny, dark colored worms on her black-eyed Susan plant. She has used some Eight but she still has some. The leaves are also turning gray, how can she control the caterpillar?

A. This could be a checkerspot caterpillar. It is commonly found on sunflower, which is a closely related species of plant to this black-eyed Susan. This becomes a good pollinator butterfly. If she can relocate the caterpillars it would be best, or the Eight will just take some time to fully work on the caterpillars. The gray on the leaves is likely due to downy mildew or powdery mildew, not the caterpillars. Caterpillars will only chew holes out of the leaves, not leave any gray coloration to the leaves. Downy or powdery mildew are not very harmful to the plant and don’t need to be sprayed. In the fall, cut down the plant and discard the infected plant material so the disease is minimized for next year.

11. A caller has an ash tree that is about 15 years old and the outside leaves are now turning brown. What is wrong with it?

A. This could be due to leaf scorch due to the hot, dry conditions we have been facing lately. The tree should be fine, it will likely look rough the rest of the year. Make sure the tree has a mulch ring and that it is being watered for about an hour weekly with a sprinkler or slow trickle from the hose.

This caller also wondered about cougars in the area. He said he has seen a cougar with 4 cubs in the area. Will the cubs all stay here or will they move through to somewhere else?

A. Males can travel many miles and across the country. Females will stay around if there is food available and if a male doesn’t chase the female cubs away. The male cubs will likely move on when they get old enough to travel alone.

12. A caller has a tree that is pushing its roots up to be exposed out of the soil. What can be done about this?

A. Mulch will be the best option for these roots. The mulch will keep you from mowing over the roots which can damage the roots. Do NOT add soil on top of these exposed roots as that can limit oxygen for those roots and eventually kill the tree. You can make the area into a perennial garden under the tree, but do not raise the soil grade to do so and do not damage the roots to do so.

13. The final caller of the day wants to know why black crappie would be larger than white crappie?

A. This could be due to genes. The color gene may be linked to the size genes. So as the color is changed genetically, so is the size. It could also be that the predators in the area this caller was fishing in preferred eating the white crappie rather than the black crappie, causing only the smaller white crappie to be left with the larger black crappie. There are many factors that could lead to this difference in size between the 2 different colored crappie.

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Yard and Garden: July 28, 2017

Yard & Garden for blog, 2017

This is the Q&A for the Yard and Garden show for July 28, 2017. Yard and Garden Live is a call-in radio show I do on KUTT 99.5 FM from 10-11:30 am and this will be the final episode from the show for 2017. It can also be found on kutt995.com for online listening. If you missed a show or just want to read through the questions, I have written them all in my blog and will continue to do so throughout the season.

Guest Host: Kevin Christiansen and Evan Alderman, Agribusiness Instructors from Southeast Community College in Beatrice

If you enjoy reading my Q&A from the show each week, take my quick survey at: http://go.unl.edu/44qr and be entered to win a free plant book or some free UNL gifts. This Survey will Close on August 18th.

1.The first caller of the day wants to know if they can still treat for bagworms that were missed with the first application?

A. If the bag is less than 1 inch in length, insecticide applications will still be effective. However, if the bags are larger than 1 inch in length, the insecticides will not work very well. Because this tree has already been sprayed this year and still has bags, I would remind everyone to ensure that they spray efficiently and according to the label, leaving areas untreated can lead to more resistance if those bagworms contacted a small concentration of the chemicals that didn’t kill them.

2. This caller called to ask me what was the best insecticide to spray for bagworms, since I left that out on the first call?

A. Tempo or Bt would be most effective. Bt is the safer alternative because it won’t harm a lot of pollinators as it just targets insects in the Lepidopteran family of insects which includes butterflies, skippers, and moths.

3. A caller has a redbud tree that blew over in a storm this spring. The roots of this tree have begun to grow some suckers. Can one of those suckers be cared for to grow into another redbud tree?

A. Yes, the suckers can be trained into a new tree. It would help the growth of the one you choose to grow if you leave the other suckers for a while as well. All of the suckers will provide energy and food to the roots, so leaving extras for a while will help. Once the main stem gets growing, you can remove the others to push the one upright.

This caller also wanted to know if he can prune his magnolia tree so he can mow under it?

A. As long as the branches are not more than half the size of the trunk and as long as you aren’t removing more than a quarter of the overall canopy the branches may be removed. The best time to prune a magnolia tree is just after it blooms in the spring, pruning now will cut off flower buds that have already developed for next spring. If the branches that would need to be removed for mowing are too large, it might be wise to change the turf to shade perennials such as carex, bleeding hearts, hostas, coral bells, jack in the pulpit, jacobs ladder, Helleborus or Lenten Rose and many other great shade plants.

4. When is the correct time to prune a burning bush?

A. Late fall after the leaves fall off would be best. It is always easier to see the branches and where problem areas are if you prune in the dormant season. Also, it will allow the plant to quickly seal up the wounds in the spring flush of growth. It is not advised to prune now because pruning woody plants after the beginning of August until when they are dormant can hurt the plant. This may cause the plant to push new growth that would be more sensitive to cool temperatures causing more dieback in the plant.

5. A caller wants to know how do you know when Butternut and Acorn squash are mature?

A. These are both winter squash varieties so the fingernail test will work just as it does with a pumpkin. When you think the winter squash is mature, push your fingernail into the rind of the fruits. If your fingernail pokes through the rind, the squash is not mature, if your fingernail does not puncture the rind, it is a mature fruit. Winter squash should have a hard rind.

6. This caller wants to know how to control windmill grass in his lawn?

A. For perennial grassy weeds such as windmill grass, there are two options for managment, either use a Glyphosate product, such as roundup, on the weed and then reseed or use a product containing Mesotrione product, such as Tenacity, on the weed and not harm the grass. The tenacity is more expensive but will not kill your grass so there will be no need to overseed.

This caller also wanted to know what would be digging up his grass?

A. This is likely due to either skunks or racoons digging the grass trying to get to grubs living in the soil. See the following NebGuides to learn how to manage these animals: Raccoons and Skunks Also, if this is due to grubs, apply a grub control next June to reduce the grub population in your lawn.

7. A caller has tomato hornworms in her garden. How can they be controlled? She also wanted to know what grubs come from and how to control them?

A. Sevin will work to control hornworms. However, the population is not usually terrible and the hornworms can be removed by hand and thrown into a bucket of soapy water for control. Grubs are the immature form of Japanese beetles, May/June Beetles, Masked Chaffer for the majority of species in Nebraska. They can be controlled in June with a grub control like the Merit products that contain Imidacloprid.

8. This caller has a 1.5 foot tall tri-colored beech that was planted in full sun this spring. About a month ago, the leaves turned brown. The caller is watering it 2-3 gallons of water every other day. What is wrong with the Beech tree?

A. Beech trees like to be in a more protected location, so this tree may be getting too much sun and too much heat. Because it is such a small tree, there is still time to replant the tree in a more protected and slightly shadier environment. Also, this small of a tree would not need this much water. When replanting it, keep it watered every other day with only about 1 gallon of water each time. After a few weeks in it’s permanent location, you can water with 1-2 gallons of water once a week and continue to back off on days between each watering as the tree grows larger. Remember, this small of a tree will not have a very large root system and it is as easy to overwater a tree as it is to underwater one.

9. How do you control moles in the lawn?

A. Moles are best controlled with a Harpoon trap that can be purchased at most hardware stores. For management tips, see this NebGuide on Moles

10. This caller has a hibiscus tree with a braided trunk that she thought would grow to zone 4, is this hibiscus going to be able to survive in Nebraska winters?

A. Unfortunately, it is highly unlikely that this is a hardy hibiscus that will survive winters in Nebraska. There is a hardy hibiscus that will survive our winters outdoors and those are suited up to zone 4, there is also a tropical hibiscus that is sold here as an indoor plant and will not survive our winter conditions outdoors. I would say that the tropical hibiscus would be the type purchased with a braided trunk. It can survive indoors during the winter months, so she can dig it up and put it into a pot to bring indoors for the winter.

2014-05-29 11.32.16

Clover in a lawn

This caller also wanted to know how to control clover?

A. Clover should be managed in the fall of the year. It will take multiple applications over multiple years to fully control clover in the lawn. Use 2,4-D or triclopyr products in the fall. It is best to apply these products around September 30th and again around the middle to the end of October.

The final question from this caller was if she should cut back her Virginia creeper plant that is turning brown?

A. Leave it alone and allow the plant to come out of the browning on its own. This is a common problem with Virginia creeper that is not terribly damaging to the plant.

11. How do you control anthracnose in tomato plants?

A. A copper fungicide can be used in a vegetable garden if necessary. However, often with home vegetable gardens it isn’t worth the time and money to spray our vegetable crops as the diseases usually only last for a short time and then fade when the temperatures change a little. However, it seems for this caller that the disease is a problem every year. For more information on controlling the disease and how to manage your vegetable gardens to avoid disease problems, visit this Nebguide on Leaf and Fruit Diseases of Tomatoes.

12. A caller has carpenter bees digging holes in her shed and wants to know how to control them?

A. Carpenter bees are a beneficial insect, except when they are burrowing into the wood framing of buildings reducing their structural integrity. They are best controlled with a dust formulation of sevin. Leave the dust in the holes a few days and then the holes can be filled in with a wood putty. For more information, see this guide from Lancaster County Extension on Carpenter Bees.

13. The final caller of the day wants to know how to control ragweed?

A. At this point, the plant is growing too strong to be killed with a herbicide. The best time to treat is in the spring before the plants have grown too large. At that time, they can be treated with 2,4-D. Now, the best control would be to dig or chop out the plants.