Yard and Garden: April 26, 2019

Yard & Garden blog, 2019

This is the Q&A for the Yard and Garden show for April 26, 2019. Yard and Garden Live is a call-in radio show I do on KUTT 99.5 FM from 10-11:30 am and it will run through August 2, 2019. It can also be found on kutt995.com for online listening. If you missed a show or just want to read through the questions, I have written them all in my blog and will continue to do so throughout the season.

Guest Host: Roch Gaussoin, Extension Specialist for UNL Agronomy and Turf

1. The first caller of the show recently applied a Weed-B-Gon product that contained crabgrass control. Now he wants to fertilize, but it is a fertilizer and crabgrass control together. Will it be harmful to put the crabgrass control on twice this spring?

A. That should be fine and you won’t see any injury from applying the crabgrass control twice this spring. You won’t need to apply any additional pesticides for the lawn this year. Next year, it would be better to do a little more planning ahead so you don’t apply the chemical twice so close together. This is just additional pesticides in the environment that are not necessary, so be careful with that in the future.

2. A caller is bringing in topsoil on a new build site. He needs to overseed, but is it getting too late to do that yet this spring?

A. Seeding the lawn will have the best results if done in the fall, but spring can get a good start on a new lawn. The weather will be the problem to lawns seeded too late this year. With the weather as it has been this year, there is likely still a 2-3 week window for overseeding the lawn with fairly good success. It might be a good idea to overseed now and then do another overseeding in the fall to thicken it up. Also, for weed control, it would help to use mesotrione (tenacity) at seeding. There is a starter fertilizer that contains the tenacity to help with start-up of the turf and to keep the weeds down while establishment occurs. It would just help to get some type of cover crop or turf down to reduce the amount of bare soil that weeds can grow into.

3. This caller has henbit. Would it be controlled well with the Tenacity? If so, should he use a stronger dose of the Tenacity because he has tried it with limited success?

A. It is Never a good practice to use pesticides at a higher rate than what is listed on the label. A lot of research went into finding the correct rate for best control of a pest. Henbit is hard to control this time of year, it is best controlled in the fall. It will die as soon as the heat of the summer comes on because it is a winter annual and doesn’t live well in hot weather. Treat in the later fall, October, with a 2,4-D product for best control.

That caller also has a peach tree that just flowered for the first time. It has two 2-inch long cracks on the tree trunk, each on opposite sides. What can be done with this?

A. Unfortunately this tree is not going to live long. There is nothing to do to fix the tree once cracks like this happen. This large of an opening is very damaging to the tree and will not allow the tree to live long. If it is out in the open where it won’t damage anything if it falls, leave it until it dies.

4. A caller has been trying to get a native grass prairie started for a few years now with limited success. He has a mix with Blue Grama, buffalograss, and little bluestem. What can he do to get it to grow better?

A. Don’t give up yet. Be sure to control the weeds with herbicides, 2,4-D won’t harm the grasses but will manage the weeds. After some photos, it shows that there is still some grass in there, but it is very early for these warm-season grasses. Keep mowing to keep the seed heads down for the weeds.

5. Can potatoes still be planted yet this spring?

A. Yes, get the potatoes in soon, and they should be fine yet this year.

What do you do for Pampas grass with a dead center?

A. Dig it up and divide it and replant it. This can still be done this spring.

She has a crabapple that has dead branches in it, can those be cut off now or should they be removed in the fruit tree pruning window of February-March?

A. Remove dead branches anytime of the year that they appear.

6. A caller wants to know when to spray for bagworms?

A. It is weather dependent. Starting in late May, check weekly for the small bags to begin to show up on the trees. When the small bags show up and until they are up to 1/2 inch in length you can spray.

He also wondered when and how to fertilize trees?

A. It really isn’t necessary to fertilize trees in Nebraska. They can get the nutrients they need from the soil naturally.

tree irrigationHow do you water trees that were recently planted?

A. water them one time per week with a slow trickle from the hose for about 20 minutes each time they are watered.

When is the best time to prune cedar trees to shape them?

A. Most anytime would be fine with a cedar tree, but the best time is in the late winter to early spring.

7. This caller has Austrian pines that are turning brown on the tips of the branches with short needles. What is causing this and how can it be controlled?

A. This sounds like tip blight. It can be treated now with a copper fungicide. A second application should be made 7-14 days after the first application.

8. What is the best thing to mulch asparagus with?

A. Grass clippings, straw, hay, or wood chip mulch can all be used to mulch asparagus. It would be best to hand pull weeds and then use preen that is labeled for use in asparagus before applying the mulch. If there is a problem with brome grass, use roundup carefully around the asparagus first as well. To carefully get the glyphosate on the brome and not on the asparagus either paint it on with a foam paint brush or use the “glove of death” which is when you wear a chemical-resistant glove and then put a cloth glove over that. Then, dip a few fingers of the gloved hand into Glyphosate and rub those fingers along the stem and leaves of the bindweed to kill it.

9. A caller has been trying to start seedlings of spruce and fir trees for a few years with limited success. He thinks it may be due to root rot because when he pulls them up the roots look rotten. How can he get the trees to grow?

A. After discussion, it seems that he doesn’t overwater the trees and may in fact not be watering them enough. He also said that he can get the trees to grow in another, more neglected, location. It was suggested that he do a soil test to see what is going on with the soil in this desired location. It might be that there is a hard pan underneath these trees that is impeding water movement through the soil causing the roots to rot.

10. This caller has been trying to get grass started and is having difficulties. He has used an aerator, seeder, lawn roller, and then waters the seed well and it is not coming in very good.

A. It seems his practices are good, so he may try a soil sample to see what the nutrient and pH levels are in his soil.

11. The last caller of the day wanted to know what the difference is between a Sycamore and a London Plane tree?

A. These trees are 2 different species of very similar trees.

 

Spring Yard Clean Up

lawnmower-pixabay
Image by Rudy and Peter Skitterians from Pixabay

Now that spring is officially here, we can really start to think about outdoor activities. Don’t get ahead of the weather though, that could cause more harm than good or cause us to have to do more work later. But now that spring is here, I thought I would help you with your to do list and when to do those things.

Lawncare

This is the time of the year when we start to see green in our lawns again. We begin to think it is time to fertilize, overseed, and use crabgrass control. Don’t get started on your lawn too early. It has been quite cold this winter and even this spring. If you get too ahead of the weather it can cause some plants to develop freeze damage or die. Overseeding can be done in April, but anytime by the end of April to the early part of May is still fine for overseeding. I would suggest waiting until at least the middle of April this year. According to Purdue University, the optimum air temperature for germination of Kentucky bluegrass seed is 59-86 degrees, for Tall fescue it is 68-86 degrees. So we can wait until it warms up more consistently before overseeding the lawn.

Fertilizer also can be left until later in the spring before it is applied. You can apply a fertilizer application as needed in mid to late April. Wait to see how the lawn greens up to determine if a spring application is necessary. If a lawn has a medium green hue in late April, skip the typical Arbor Day application in favor of one in late May to early June.

It’s also a good time to clean the lawn from winter debris. Branches and leaves may have fallen during the winter, now’s the time to rake these up and remove them before mowing begins. It’s also be a good idea to clean pet waste from your lawns. Pet waste tends to build up over winter and can become a pollutant in water when it runs off your lawn and into storm drains.

Crabgrass Control

fertilizer spreaderDon’t get started with crabgrass control too soon this spring. The soil temperatures are still in the low 40 degree range. Crabgrass preventer should not be applied until the soil temperature is consistently at 55-60 degrees Fahrenheit. Even if a few early warm days cause crabgrass to germinate, if these days are followed by freezing temperatures, any crabgrass that germinated will die from cold temperatures. If you apply crabgrass preventer too early in the spring, it will break down too early causing more crabgrass to germinate later in the year.

Spring vegetable gardens

Vegetable gardens can be worked in the spring as soon as the ground is dry and workable. Cool season crops such as peas, potatoes, carrots, raddish, kohlrabi, lettuce, and spinach can be planted now. Asparagus beds can be cleaned up now and new asparagus patches can be started. Make sure that the soil is dry before you work the garden or plant any vegetables. Planting into mud can compact the soil and disrupt the growth of plants.

Wait to plant warm season crops such as tomatoes, cucumbers, peppers, eggplant, and beans until Mother’s Day, or until after our average frost free date, which is the end of April for the Beatrice area.

Cleaning up perennials

If you didn’t clean your perennial beds last fall, wait until mid-April before you begin cleaning them this spring. Those plants have been protected from the plant debris from last year’s growth, removing that now would expose the crowns and could kill the plant if cold temperatures return. You can begin to refresh your mulch anytime now. Apply 2-3 inches of mulch around your flower beds to protect them from weed competition and to keep the roots at a uniform temperature with added moisture.

 

 

 

 

Crabgrass

crabgrass, Joseph Berger, Bugwood
Crabgrass photo, courtesy of Joseph Berger, Bugwood.org

This time of the year is always full of activities to do outside. It is a great time to get outside in the comfortable weather. Lawncare is always at the top of our spring outdoor ‘to do’ list, and crabgrass is number one on the concerns.

Crabgrass Basics

Crabgrass is a summer annual grassy weed that takes advantage of thin areas in our lawns to become established. As a summer annual weed, crabgrass germinates in the spring and, if not controlled, new plants continue to germinate throughout the summer. Each plant grows for one summer, then dies with the first hard frost in the fall. New crabgrass that you see in your lawn each year is from seed that was set the previous year by the crabgrass growing before.

Crabgrass is a problem in our lawns. Each plant will compete with our desirable grass species. Once crabgrass gets into a lawn, it will compete with our grass for water, sunlight and growing space. Plants produce a large amount of seed that will germinate the following year, creating an ongoing problem on your lawn.

Prevention

Crabgrass is difficult to eradicate once it becomes established, so it is better to prevent this weed from becoming established in the first place. Crabgrass preemergent herbicides are used to inhibit the growth of young seedlings, destroying them before they can emerge from the soil. Which is why many people prefer to use a preemergent herbicide to control the crabgrass in their lawn.

Preemergent herbicides should be applied before crabgrass has started to germinate, which happens when soil temperature has reached 55-60 degrees F, measured at 4-inch soil depth, for at least four days. This is not based on a date range, because soil temperatures differ from year to year. It is based on the weather conditions for that year. We have reached that point now this year.

It is not beneficial to apply the preemergent too early in the year. Once applied products begin to degrade and breakdown. If your application is made too early, before crabgrass germination has started, you are wasting your product and monty because you will have a shortened period of control once crabgrass does start germination.

Plan on making two applications of preemergent to give season-long crabgrass control. Purchase enough product in spring for two applications; garden centers often run out of preemergent products by the end of spring so it could be hard to find later in summer. Each product has a slightly different length of residual action, so follow the product’s label directions on when the second application should be made.

Controlling Existing Plants

Post-emergent herbicides can be used to control crabgrass that has emerged in your lawn. Products containing Mesotrione, commonly found in the product called Tenacity, works as both a pre- and post- emergent herbicide on grasses and broadleaf weeds. It can also be used at seeding if you have a history of crabgrass problems and need to overseed.

The other commonly used post-emergent herbicide for controlling crabgrass would be products that contain Quinclorac, commonly found in the product called Drive.

If crabgrass does appear in your lawn, you can reduce future problems by keeping plants mowed short enough that they don’t produce seedheads. Then at least there won’t be additional seed in the soil to increase your problem next year.

What to do in the Spring?

Spring Things Blog Post

Spring is here. That is wonderful for the weather and the desired plants and flowers, but it also means the insects and weeds are coming back. If you know what you are dealing with, management is achievable.  

Henbit

Henbit is one of those not so desirable weeds that shows up in our lawns in the spring. We don’t really notice it until it begins to bloom and at that point, it is too late for control. Henbit is the early spring weed that blooms purple along the edges of our sidewalks and driveways.

henbit, steve dewey, Utah State Univ, Bugwood
Photo of Henbit from Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org

Henbit is a winter annual. This means that henbit only lives for one growing season, but it’s development is different from something like crabgrass which is a summer annual. A winter annual is a plant that germinates in the fall and grows a bit before basically becoming dormant for the winter months. Very early in the spring, henbit will start to grow again, produce flowers and seed for the next year then it will die when the temperatures warm up. This is different from a summer annual which germinates in the spring and goes through its lifecycle through the summer months and dies with our fall frosts.

The problem with henbit is that by the time we see it, or rather see the purple flowers, it is too late to treat for the year. Once the flowers begin to show up, it is already producing seed for next year, so killing blooming henbit is unnecessary because it will die naturally and the chemicals won’t reduce production for next year. However, pulling the plant would be a fine management practice after blooming has begun. It can be sprayed with a 2,4-D product very early in the spring once it has greened up but before it blooms. If you know where it is you can spray it before it blooms. Otherwise, wait until this fall to spray those areas with a pre-emergent herbicide before it germinates in the fall.

Lawncare

This is the time of the year when we want to start seeing color in our lawns. We begin to think we need to fertilize, overseed, and use crabgrass control. Don’t get ahead of the weather with these things. It is still fairly early for overseeding, it can be done in April, but anytime by the end of April to the early part of May is still fine for overseeding. Overseeding too early could cause the seed to germinate in warmer weather. If that warm weather is followed by freezing temperatures, it could damage the newly emerged grass. Fertilization should not be applied until mid to late April when temperatures warm up more consistently.

Crabgrass preventer should not be applied too early in the year either or it will break down before the crabgrass begins to emerge. Crabgrass preventer should be applied when the soils are consistently at 55-60 degrees Fahrenheit. A split application, applying more 6-8 weeks after the first application will ensure crabgrass control through the season.

Asparagus

green-asparagus-pixabayAsparagus is a great vegetable that many people enjoy growing and eating. Now is the time to clean up your asparagus beds if you haven’t done so already. It is a good practice to allow asparagus fronds to stand through the winter to help trap snow during the winter months, providing moisture for the crown of the plant as the snow melts.

If you are planting a new asparagus bed, dig a trench 6-8 inches deep and plant the crowns in that, only covering with a couple of inches of soil. As the plants grow up through the soil, continue to add a couple of inches of soil at a time until the soil in the trench is level with the surrounding soil. Wait for 3 years before you begin harvesting to allow the roots to get fully established.

Salt is not a recommended weed control for asparagus. Asparagus is a salt tolerant plant, but it doesn’t thrive in salty soil environments. Also, the salt in the soil can begin to break down the surrounding soil, leaving you with bad soil for the asparagus and other plants growing nearby. For weed control, it is best to use mulch throughout the season.