Yard and Garden: May 19, 2017

Yard & Garden for blog, 2017

This is the Q&A for the Yard and Garden show for May 19, 2017. Yard and Garden Live is a call-in radio show I do on KUTT 99.5 FM from 10-11:30 am and it will run through July 28, 2017. It can also be found on kutt995.com for online listening. If you missed a show or just want to read through the questions, I have written them all in my blog and will continue to do so throughout the season.

Guest Host: Jim Kalisch, Insect Diagnostician for Nebraska Extension

If you enjoy reading my Q&A from the show each week, take my quick survey at: http://go.unl.edu/44qr and be entered to win a free plant book or some free UNL gifts.

1. The first question of the day was from a gentleman wondering how to tell when to water his self-watering containers? There is no viewer or gauge to show the water level on the outside of the container.

A. Because a self-watering container is continually watering the plants in it, it can always be refilled. In this case, this container will keep your plants watered for at least a week to two so, they should be refilled before they completely dry up. I would suggest refilling the reservoir every week to 10 days.

Bagworm4

Bagworm

2. A caller has bagworms in their cedars. What is the best way to see them before they get too big to treat?

A. They haven’t hatched yet this year. Mark the branch you have a living bag on with flag tape to check the same bag every week from now until they hatch. You can also place a few bags in a container and keep it in the tree to see when they hatch in the container. Wait a couple of weeks after the initial emergence to ensure that all of the bagworms have hatched before spraying. The bags in the shade will take longer before they hatch. Once they have hatched, Bt is a good insecticide to use when they are young or you can use a product containing bifenthrin in it for longer lasting control.

3. This caller is wondering what types of problems we can expect in the garden, lawn, and trees this year due to the excess rain?

A. The rains in the spring tend to lead to more fungal diseases this time of the year, but they are not terribly harmful and many should fade out as the summer heats and dries up. Many things to watch out for would include fungal diseases in the lawns and trees. We are already seeing Peach Leaf Curl, different fungi in blue spruces, anthracnose on the leaves, and mushrooms popping up in our lawns. We will also see more problems from earthworms and fungus gnats which are mostly nuisance problems.

2015-09-22 18.45.39

Squash bugs on a zucchini

4. How do you effectively control squash bugs in the vegetable garden?

A. Squash bugs are difficult to control in our cucurbit vegetables including zucchini, squash, pumpkins, gourds, melons, and cucumbers. The best option is to kill the adults when they first emerge to manage the population before it explodes. Watch for the eggs as they develop on the underside of the leaves to destroy them before they emerge. Switch to other chemicals for management besides just using “Sevin” for control, which they are becoming resistant to. There are also lures that can be used for them which might help early in the season.

5. A caller has an Oregon Trail Maple that leafed out early this spring. Now the leaves are slightly cupped and turning yellow along the edges. What would be causing this?

A. This sounds like frost damage. If the leaves came out early, they may have been nipped by a light frost in late April. We are seeing this problem throughout many trees and shrubs this spring. The leaves may drop entirely from the tree, but the tree will then push secondary buds to produce new leaves that are not injured.

6. This caller wants to know how to propagate a lilac and a hydrangea.

A. For lilacs: A cutting can be taken from the shrub. Cut off a small, pencil-sized, branch and place it into rooting hormone than plant it into a pot of gravel that is kept moist. Once roots have formed, the plant can be transplanted into the ground. They can also be propagated through a process called layering which is where you bend a flexible branch down to the ground and plant it to allow roots to form on the branch while it is still attached to the main plant. Once roots form, cut it from the parent plant and transplant it. There is more information on this in the NebGuide: Lilacs

Hydrangeas can also be layered to produce new plants or they can be divided. It is too late to do the division this year, but early next spring you can dig up the plant and use a spade to divide the main plant and replant the pieces. Depending on the side you can get 2-4 pieces from a divided plant.

7. Is cedar-apple rust damaging to cedar trees?

A. Cedar-apple rust shows up in the spring on cedar trees as a orange, slimy, ball with horns. This is the gall that opens up with rains in the spring. Cedar-apple rust is not harmful to the cedar tree, it just uses the cedar trees as an alternate host through the winter. When these galls are seen on the cedar, that is the time to spray any susceptible apple, crabapple, pear, or hawthorne tree to avoid damage to them. For more information view this NebGuide

8. This caller has a pink peony that hasn’t bloomed well this year. There is some discoloration and fuzzy appearance to the leaves and buds. What would cause that?

A. This sounds like botrytis blight, a common fungal disease to our peonies. It is not very harmful to the plant itself, so it is not necessary to control it. In the fall, make sure you remove and destroy all of the plant material to reduce the spread to your plants next spring.

9. A caller has a Chanticleer Pear with leaves that have black spots on them and the top isn’t leafing out this spring. What would cause that?

A. This could be due to frost damage as well. Or check the tree for oozing sap along the trunk or branches. The damage could be from borers. It might also be from fireblight which would cause the leaves to turn black on some branches where the end of the branch hooks over like a shepherds crook. Fireblight is likely since this showed up in the tree last summer. If it is fireblight, prune out the infected branches and dip your pruners into a bleach water solution in between the cuts.

10. This caller has roses that had dieback from the winter. She pruned them off in early April and now it looks like the only live growth is coming from the ground. What is wrong with her roses and will they come out of it?

A. Unfortunately, these roses seem to have more dieback from the late frost we saw in April. If there is no green growth showing up on the main part of the plant, it is likely that it has died back. The roots would be shooting the new growth from the ground, but that is not going to be the same type of rose that you had there before because our roses are often grafted. The growth from the ground would be from the rootstock so it wouldn’t be the size and color of rose that was originally purchased. Unfortunately there is nothing that can be done about that. It might be time to go and choose some new rose colors for your garden.

11. A caller has a river birch tree that dropped its leaves in the summer last year. The leaves now are yellow and only the top half of the tree has leafed out this spring. They are 20 year old river birch trees. What would be causing this problem?

A. Look on the branches of the tree for signs of bronze birch borer. Some of the signs of this borer would be rippling on the branches or holes in the stem or branches. If you find the signs of bronze birch borer, you can treat it now with a borer spray or with a systemic insecticide.

12. A caller has a river birch tree that was growing in a clump and one of the trunks of the group died out. Should it be removed now?

A. Yes, any dead part of a tree should be removed as soon as it is noticed. A large part of a river birch, like this, could be hazardous if left standing after it dies. Unfortunately, when that branch is pruned off decay will likely begin but there is no way to prevent that at this point. This will likely be a large portion of the tree removed and that large of a pruning cut may not ever heal over entirely. When a branch doesn’t seal up, decay can get into the tree causing more damage. We don’t advise painting the stump with anything.

13. A question came in via email regarding a red twig dogwood. This dogwood is 4-5 years old and has never been pruned. Following the storms this week, some branches are falling over blocking a mowing path. Can those be pruned now? What should be done with it in the future?

A. Broken branches can be removed at any time. If these are just bending over, they could still be removed if necessary, but they may pop back up to their normal standing position. For future, red twig dogwoods should be pruned to the ground every 3-5 years to maintain that good red color on the twigs. They should be pruned in the late winter to early spring.

14. A lady called who has a Cranberry Bush Viburnum that has dead branches in it. Can those dead branches be pruned out now?

A. Yes, dead branches should always be removed when they are noticed. Check to ensure that these branches didn’t die due to Viburnum borers, if so, treat with a borer spray or systemic insecticide.

15. The last caller of the day has 2 different plants that have problems. A maple tree has brown specks on the leaves and they are falling off the tree. A Peony bush has leaves that are turning yellow along the edges of the leaf. What would be causing these two problems?

A. These both sound like frost damage. They will both be fine. The maple may drop all the damaged leaves and put on new growth.

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Yard and Garden: May 12, 2017

Yard & Garden for blog, 2017

This is the Q&A for the Yard and Garden show for May 12, 2017. Yard and Garden Live is a call-in radio show I do on KUTT 99.5 FM from 10-11:30 am and it will run through July 28, 2017. It can also be found on kutt995.com for online listening. If you missed a show or just want to read through the questions, I have written them all in my blog and will continue to do so throughout the season.

Guest Host: Dr. Paul Read, Viticulture Specialist from UNL

1. The first caller of the day called to ask when is the best time to take cuttings from grape vines and how should it be completed?

A: To take a cutting, when you cut off the dormant growth from the previous year, you can take those branches and put them in moist sand to get them to root. After the last spring frost of the year, you can plant those rooted branches outdoors. When you do this method, you need 2-3 buds on each branch. Put at least 1 bud into the ground and have 1-2 buds out of the ground for leaf growth. At this time of the year, you can complete the layering method of propagation. For layering, just bury a few of the longer branches that are still attached to the vine. Once they root, you can cut them from the main plant and replant somewhere else.

2. A caller has a 7 year old peach tree that is dropping leaves like it is fall. What would be causing this to happen and can it be corrected?

A: This could be abiotic stress due to unfavorable environmental conditions. It could also be from peach tree borer. Look along the trunk for small borer holes or sap oozing from branches or the trunk to know if it is the borer. If borers, spray the trunk with a fruit tree insecticide spray. If it doesn’t seem to be from insects, keep the tree healthy through a good mulch ring and regular watering as needed when natural rains are infrequent.

3. This caller has 2 concord grapes that were producing well last year but were taken by the birds before they could be harvested. How can you keep these birds away?

A: Bird netting over the plants to keep the birds out is the only good, effective method of managing birds in grapes.

This caller also wanted to know what is wrong with her peach trees? She has 2 peach trees that are 9-10 years old that now have an orange sap oozing from the trunk.

A: This would be from gummosis, a fungal disease common on peach trees. There is no real cure for this disease, it is just best to prune out the small branches that are affected and cut 6-8 inches below the infected area. Dip your pruners into a bleach/water solution between cuts to prevent further spread of the disease. It could also be from peach tree borers. In that case, use an insecticide labeled for use on peaches for borers.

4. A caller has a row of cottonwoods but there is one tree in the middle that always has yellow leaves rather than green leaves. What is wrong with it and can it be corrected?

A: This is most likely due to an iron deficiency in this tree. That can be corrected by having a certified arborist come in to do a trunk injection. The granules or stakes around the tree are not very effective. Often, iron chlorosis is a sign of other problems with the tree and may be the beginning of the end for the tree. That being said, many of our trees live many years after developing an iron deficiency and some just need an iron injection every 5+ years to live a long and happy life.

Tree hole for blog

Photo of the damage occurring to the Maple tree.

5. A caller has some maples that were recently pruned and the branches had a fungus and some white powdery substance in them when the branches were removed. What is wrong with them and do they need to be removed?

A: This caller emailed me with photos of the problem so I could see for sure what is wrong with the plants and if it can be corrected or if it is a safety issue. Unfortunately, this does look like decay in the tree. Decay within the interior of the tree can be dangerous for when it may fall, the tree is not stable when it has decay. I would guess that the tree has a large limb that was removed at one time and it was too big or improperly cut and now there is a large hole leading into the tree. I would get a certified arborist out to take a look and possibly remove the tree.

6. This caller has a cedar windbreak and would like to plant crabapples. Can crabapple trees grow near a cedar tree?

A: Yes, you can plant crabapple trees near cedars, just make sure that you select a variety that is resistant to cedar-apple rust to avoid having to spray annually to avoid the damage from cedar-apple rust.

7. A caller has a blue spruce tree that is 8 feet tall and was planted 14 years ago that died over the winter months. What happened and how can it be avoided in the other trees in the row?

A: This could be due to a canker which is a fungal disease that stops the flow of water and nutrients from the canker point outward and upward through the tree. If the canker occurred on the lower part of the trunk it would cause the tree to die. There is no cure for canker and no way to prevent it. It could also be due to a root issue that could have happened when the tree was planted or in the nursery. The tree may have a root that girdled the stem killing the tree or it may have been planted to deeply. When you remove the tree, look at the root system to see if this was the problem.

8. This caller has small brown circles in the lawn all around a tree. This problem occurs every year later in the summer in the same location of the lawn. What would be causing this and can it be controlled?

A: This is most likely due to summer patch, a common lawn fungal disease that occurs in the mid-late summer. Normally, this isn’t something that is treated for because it doesn’t occur in the same location every year, but for this caller, it does. Management practices in the lawn can help, such as mowing higher and doing core aeration to reduce the thatch layer in the lawn. If necessary, fungicides labeled for summer patch can be used from now until the end of June.

Summer Patch, L. Giesler turf update

Summer Patch in Kentucky bluegrass photo by Loren Giesler, UNL Plant Pathology

9. What is a better species selection than using Bradford pear?

A: Chanticleer or Cleveland Select are better options for pear trees than a Bradford Pear. Bradford pears tend to have narrow branch arrangement that leads to more broken branches from high winds and storms. These two options are better choices because their branches are wider when arranged on the trunk.

10. A caller has a maple tree that is half green and half a much lighter green color. What would cause this and can it be corrected?

A: The soil pH is higher on one side. A disturbance on the one side could cause it to have iron deficiency on the lighter green side. Try to spray chelated iron on the lighter green side to fix the problem.

11. When is the best time to start asparagus?

A: Spring is the best time, from March to April is prime time for planting asparagus crowns. Be sure to still wait 3 years before full harvest begins.

12. The final caller of the day had 2 questions. She had botrytis on her strawberries last year and sprayed a week ago. Does she need to spray again? Also, can an Annabel Hydrangea be planted in full sun?

A: For the strawberries, apply from 5-10% bloom until flowers have finished blooming. For more information see the Midwest Small Fruit and Grape Spray Guide from Midwest Universities including UNL. Annabel Hydrangea is one that prefers partial shade. I would avoid planting it in full sun on the South or West side of a building where it would get too hot.