Yard and Garden: May 19, 2017

Yard & Garden for blog, 2017

This is the Q&A for the Yard and Garden show for May 19, 2017. Yard and Garden Live is a call-in radio show I do on KUTT 99.5 FM from 10-11:30 am and it will run through July 28, 2017. It can also be found on kutt995.com for online listening. If you missed a show or just want to read through the questions, I have written them all in my blog and will continue to do so throughout the season.

Guest Host: Jim Kalisch, Insect Diagnostician for Nebraska Extension

If you enjoy reading my Q&A from the show each week, take my quick survey at: http://go.unl.edu/44qr and be entered to win a free plant book or some free UNL gifts.

1. The first question of the day was from a gentleman wondering how to tell when to water his self-watering containers? There is no viewer or gauge to show the water level on the outside of the container.

A. Because a self-watering container is continually watering the plants in it, it can always be refilled. In this case, this container will keep your plants watered for at least a week to two so, they should be refilled before they completely dry up. I would suggest refilling the reservoir every week to 10 days.

Bagworm4

Bagworm

2. A caller has bagworms in their cedars. What is the best way to see them before they get too big to treat?

A. They haven’t hatched yet this year. Mark the branch you have a living bag on with flag tape to check the same bag every week from now until they hatch. You can also place a few bags in a container and keep it in the tree to see when they hatch in the container. Wait a couple of weeks after the initial emergence to ensure that all of the bagworms have hatched before spraying. The bags in the shade will take longer before they hatch. Once they have hatched, Bt is a good insecticide to use when they are young or you can use a product containing bifenthrin in it for longer lasting control.

3. This caller is wondering what types of problems we can expect in the garden, lawn, and trees this year due to the excess rain?

A. The rains in the spring tend to lead to more fungal diseases this time of the year, but they are not terribly harmful and many should fade out as the summer heats and dries up. Many things to watch out for would include fungal diseases in the lawns and trees. We are already seeing Peach Leaf Curl, different fungi in blue spruces, anthracnose on the leaves, and mushrooms popping up in our lawns. We will also see more problems from earthworms and fungus gnats which are mostly nuisance problems.

2015-09-22 18.45.39

Squash bugs on a zucchini

4. How do you effectively control squash bugs in the vegetable garden?

A. Squash bugs are difficult to control in our cucurbit vegetables including zucchini, squash, pumpkins, gourds, melons, and cucumbers. The best option is to kill the adults when they first emerge to manage the population before it explodes. Watch for the eggs as they develop on the underside of the leaves to destroy them before they emerge. Switch to other chemicals for management besides just using “Sevin” for control, which they are becoming resistant to. There are also lures that can be used for them which might help early in the season.

5. A caller has an Oregon Trail Maple that leafed out early this spring. Now the leaves are slightly cupped and turning yellow along the edges. What would be causing this?

A. This sounds like frost damage. If the leaves came out early, they may have been nipped by a light frost in late April. We are seeing this problem throughout many trees and shrubs this spring. The leaves may drop entirely from the tree, but the tree will then push secondary buds to produce new leaves that are not injured.

6. This caller wants to know how to propagate a lilac and a hydrangea.

A. For lilacs: A cutting can be taken from the shrub. Cut off a small, pencil-sized, branch and place it into rooting hormone than plant it into a pot of gravel that is kept moist. Once roots have formed, the plant can be transplanted into the ground. They can also be propagated through a process called layering which is where you bend a flexible branch down to the ground and plant it to allow roots to form on the branch while it is still attached to the main plant. Once roots form, cut it from the parent plant and transplant it. There is more information on this in the NebGuide: Lilacs

Hydrangeas can also be layered to produce new plants or they can be divided. It is too late to do the division this year, but early next spring you can dig up the plant and use a spade to divide the main plant and replant the pieces. Depending on the side you can get 2-4 pieces from a divided plant.

7. Is cedar-apple rust damaging to cedar trees?

A. Cedar-apple rust shows up in the spring on cedar trees as a orange, slimy, ball with horns. This is the gall that opens up with rains in the spring. Cedar-apple rust is not harmful to the cedar tree, it just uses the cedar trees as an alternate host through the winter. When these galls are seen on the cedar, that is the time to spray any susceptible apple, crabapple, pear, or hawthorne tree to avoid damage to them. For more information view this NebGuide

8. This caller has a pink peony that hasn’t bloomed well this year. There is some discoloration and fuzzy appearance to the leaves and buds. What would cause that?

A. This sounds like botrytis blight, a common fungal disease to our peonies. It is not very harmful to the plant itself, so it is not necessary to control it. In the fall, make sure you remove and destroy all of the plant material to reduce the spread to your plants next spring.

9. A caller has a Chanticleer Pear with leaves that have black spots on them and the top isn’t leafing out this spring. What would cause that?

A. This could be due to frost damage as well. Or check the tree for oozing sap along the trunk or branches. The damage could be from borers. It might also be from fireblight which would cause the leaves to turn black on some branches where the end of the branch hooks over like a shepherds crook. Fireblight is likely since this showed up in the tree last summer. If it is fireblight, prune out the infected branches and dip your pruners into a bleach water solution in between the cuts.

10. This caller has roses that had dieback from the winter. She pruned them off in early April and now it looks like the only live growth is coming from the ground. What is wrong with her roses and will they come out of it?

A. Unfortunately, these roses seem to have more dieback from the late frost we saw in April. If there is no green growth showing up on the main part of the plant, it is likely that it has died back. The roots would be shooting the new growth from the ground, but that is not going to be the same type of rose that you had there before because our roses are often grafted. The growth from the ground would be from the rootstock so it wouldn’t be the size and color of rose that was originally purchased. Unfortunately there is nothing that can be done about that. It might be time to go and choose some new rose colors for your garden.

11. A caller has a river birch tree that dropped its leaves in the summer last year. The leaves now are yellow and only the top half of the tree has leafed out this spring. They are 20 year old river birch trees. What would be causing this problem?

A. Look on the branches of the tree for signs of bronze birch borer. Some of the signs of this borer would be rippling on the branches or holes in the stem or branches. If you find the signs of bronze birch borer, you can treat it now with a borer spray or with a systemic insecticide.

12. A caller has a river birch tree that was growing in a clump and one of the trunks of the group died out. Should it be removed now?

A. Yes, any dead part of a tree should be removed as soon as it is noticed. A large part of a river birch, like this, could be hazardous if left standing after it dies. Unfortunately, when that branch is pruned off decay will likely begin but there is no way to prevent that at this point. This will likely be a large portion of the tree removed and that large of a pruning cut may not ever heal over entirely. When a branch doesn’t seal up, decay can get into the tree causing more damage. We don’t advise painting the stump with anything.

13. A question came in via email regarding a red twig dogwood. This dogwood is 4-5 years old and has never been pruned. Following the storms this week, some branches are falling over blocking a mowing path. Can those be pruned now? What should be done with it in the future?

A. Broken branches can be removed at any time. If these are just bending over, they could still be removed if necessary, but they may pop back up to their normal standing position. For future, red twig dogwoods should be pruned to the ground every 3-5 years to maintain that good red color on the twigs. They should be pruned in the late winter to early spring.

14. A lady called who has a Cranberry Bush Viburnum that has dead branches in it. Can those dead branches be pruned out now?

A. Yes, dead branches should always be removed when they are noticed. Check to ensure that these branches didn’t die due to Viburnum borers, if so, treat with a borer spray or systemic insecticide.

15. The last caller of the day has 2 different plants that have problems. A maple tree has brown specks on the leaves and they are falling off the tree. A Peony bush has leaves that are turning yellow along the edges of the leaf. What would be causing these two problems?

A. These both sound like frost damage. They will both be fine. The maple may drop all the damaged leaves and put on new growth.

Yard and Garden: May 8, 2015

Yard and Garden Green Logo

This is the Q&A for the Yard and Garden show for May 8, 2015. Yard and Garden Live is a call-in radio show I do on KUTT 99.5 FM from 10-11:30 am and it will run through July 31, 2015. It can also be found on kutt995.com for online listening. If you missed a show or just want to read through the questions, I have written them all in my blog and will continue to do so throughout the season.

Guest Host: Graham Herbst, Community Forester with the Nebraska Forest Service

1. This caller has pampas grass growing in her yard that last winter had problems with winterkill. What would be a good alternative ornamental grass she could plant?

A: Pampas grass had a lot of problems with winterkill last spring due to the dry, cold, windy winter conditions we faced in the winter of 2013-2014. Pampas grass is on the edge of its hardiness zone in Nebraska, but there are many other options for native grasses here. Maidenhair grass, or Miscanthus, is a great choice for a large native grass and it has many varieties to choose many different qualities. Big Bluestem and Little bluestem are great native choices, as well as switchgrass, sideoats grama, and many more. Ornamental grasses give us winter interest and habitat and food for wildlife during the winter months.

2. A caller had a sewer that was dug out and filled with soil. She then seeded new turfgrass on the area that has come up and is growing well. This spring the area sunk back down 6 inches. What can she do to level this area out?

A: You can remove the grass from that area, gathering 4-6 inches of soil and roots with it. Add soil to bring that back up to level with the surrounding lawn, and replace the grass piece back on top. Keep this grass well-watered until it becomes established, it will act like a piece of sod. The other option would be to back fill the location with soil and reseed the area with turf seed.

3. A caller has orange odd-looking structures hanging off of her cedar trees. What is this? Will it harm the tree?

Winter gall of Cedar-apple rust.

Winter gall of Cedar-apple rust.

A: These would be the galls from a disease called cedar-apple rust. This disease requires 2 hosts to complete its lifecycle, a cedar and an apple or something else in the Malus family such as a pear or crabapple. This disease overwinters on cedar trees as a hard, brown, odd-shaped structure on the branches and with spring rains they open up to look like orange, gelatinous, galls that are reminiscent of an orange octopus. This is when the spores are spreading to the apple trees. This disease causes no real damage to cedar trees, but on apple trees it causes lesions on the apples and leaf spots. Here is a NebGuide on Cedar-Apple Rust.

4. This caller has 3 apple trees and this winter one of them has not bloomed nor leafed out. Is the tree dead?

A: Check the tree for living tissue by scraping the bark off to expose green or brown tissue underneath. If it is green, it is still alive, if it is brown it is dead. Also check the branches for flexibility, if they bend they are still alive if the break they are dead. Give the tree a few more weeks to see if it comes out of it later this spring.

5. This caller has moles in their yard. How can they be controlled?

A: Moles can be controlled with traps. These traps will euthanize the mole in the hole to be left behind after control has been achieved. These have the best effect if the mound is pushed down 2-3 times prior to placing the trap in the hole, this will show if the tunnel is an active one before the trap is placed in it. Here is a guide from the Internet Center for Wildlife Damage Management on Mole Control.

6. This caller has voles in their yard. How can they be controlled?

A: Voles are controlled with snap traps that we typically use for mice. Place 2 traps in the run from the voles, or the area where the grass is damaged. Place the traps perpendicular to the runs and place them facing in different directions in the run. So, for a vole run that goes North to South, place one trap facing east and one facing west. Here is a guide from the Internet Center for Wildlife Damage Management on Vole Control.

7. This gentleman had used Scotts liquid turf builder on his lawn and it is not working to green up the lawn or to reduce the weeds found in his lawn. He also has a zoysiagrass lawn that is not growing as well in some portions of his lawn as it has in the past. What would be causing these problems and how can he improve these?

A: Broadleaf weeds are best controlled in the fall so it is best to apply a broadleaf weed killer, such as 2,4-D, 2 times in the fall, such as September 30 and October 15. Even in the spring, some control can be achieved, but they will require more than one application as they are tough weeds to kill. The zoysiagrass may have experienced some winterkill so it might be wise to take plugs from the area of the lawn where it is growing well and move them into areas of the lawn where it is not growing so well.

8. This caller has ash trees that are getting oval-shaped holes in them and ants on the trunk of the tree. Did the ants do this to the tree? How can it be managed?

A: These ants are probably carpenter ants. Carpenter ants do not harm your trees, they will just burrow into wood that has already begun to decay for some other reason. Carpenter ants on a tree do not require treatment. The holes are most likely due to native borers of the ash tree, such as red-headed ash tree borers or ash-lilac borer. These borers can be controlled with a trunk spray with chemicals such as sevin or eight or apply a soil drench with an imidacloprid product around the base of the trunk. This doesn’t sound like it is Emerald Ash Borer because the holes from EAB are D-shaped, not rounded or oval.

9. This caller has an ash tree and wants to know when he should treat it? He has heard that it takes up to 5 years for the systemic insecticides to move throughout the tree into the canopy, if this is true should he treat now.

A: Systemic insecticides take only a couple of weeks to move throughout the entire tree and they only last for 1 or 2 years depending on which chemical is used. It is best to wait until Emerald Ash Borer gets within 15 miles of the tree before treatment begins because treatments are costly, damaging to the tree, and not necessary until the borer gets closer. Trunk injections wound the tree and after repeated years of treatments it causes a great deal of stress to the tree, so there is no need to treat and harm the tree prior to when it is necessary.