Yard and Garden: April 7, 2017

Yard & Garden for blog, 2017

This is the Q&A for the Yard and Garden show for April 7, 2017. Yard and Garden Live is a call-in radio show I do on KUTT 99.5 FM from 10-11:30 am and it will run through July 28, 2017. It can also be found on kutt995.com for online listening. If you missed a show or just want to read through the questions, I have written them all in my blog and will continue to do so throughout the season.

Guest Hosts: Jonathan Larson, Extension Entomologist from Douglas-Sarpy Counties & Jody Green, Extension Entomologist from Lancaster County

1. The first question was to see if we could guess the caller’s favorite insect that was described as a moth with large, light green wings and feathery antennae?

A. This is a luna moth

2. A caller has moles in the yard and wants to know how to manage them?

A. A harpoon type of trap can be used, but should be prepped ahead of installation. This trap tends to work best if you stomp on a run to determine if it is an active run.  If it gets pushed back up, it is an active run. Stomp on this area a couple of more times and then set the trap to ensure the mole moves through the area. For more information on moles, click here for a publication from UNL on moles.

3. This caller wants to know how to get rid of creeping charlie in a lawn?

A. Triclopyr or a 2,4-D product can be used in the fall. For best control, use the product twice in the fall 2-3 weeks apart. September 30th and October 15th would be good dates for application. This is a tough weed to control, so it will take multiple years of multiple applications. A spring application of either of these products can be used as well to knock the weeds back for this year.

4. When can you transplant daylilies? Can they be planted into an area on the east side of the house with rock mulch?

A. Wait a couple of weeks until mid-late April to transplant them when the temperatures have warmed up more. Also, as long as the area is receiving at least 6 hours of sunlight daylilies will grow fine. This is a tough plant that will grow well in most conditions.

5. A caller has strawberries that had botrytis last year. When should they be sprayed to prevent the disease this year?

A. Apply from 5-10% bloom until flowers have finished blooming. For more information see the Midwest Small Fruit and Grape Spray Guide from Midwest Universities including UNL.

6. This caller has a pear tree that last year had orange spots on the leaves later in the season. What is this and how can it be controlled?

A. This is due to a rust disease, Cedar-Hawthorn Rust. It is more common in years following a wet spring. The timing for management is in the spring, May and June. See this NebGuide on Cedar-apple rust and related rusts of apples and ornamentals.

7. A caller has started corn, watermelons, and cantaloupe indoors from seed. The seedlings are getting quite large. Can they be transplanted outdoors now?

A. Unfortunately it is still too cold to plant these crops outdoors. These are warm season crops that should not be planted until early May after the frost-free date. These crops could be direct seeded at that time or transplanted but they tend to not do well as a transplant.

8. A caller has 2-year-old rhubarb plants that have come up and have thin, limp stalks. What is wrong with the rhubarb?

A. This could be due to crown rot. Rhubarb is very sensitive to high moisture soils and will often develop a crown rot in these situations. Those plants that have limp stalks should be removed and you can replant in a new location where it has more well-drained soil.

Bagworm4

Bagworm

9. When and what should you spray for bagworms?

A. May-June is the time frame for treating bagworms. It is best to spray them when the new bags are 1/2-1 inches long. Longer than that and they won’t catch as much of the pesticide to die as well. For spray choices, any general insecticide will work, but using Bt would be the least damaging to other insects because Bt only affects insects in the Order of Lepidoptera which includes butterflies, moths, and skippers.

10. A caller has Asparagus that has a green moss-like structure growing on top of the ground around it. What is it and what can they do for it?

A. A picture would be helpful in identifying this pest. If it is actually a moss, they may look into the water in the area because it is likely that it is too wet. If it is a weed, pull or hoe the weed and then add a layer of mulch to prevent further weeds from coming in.

11. This caller wanted to know what to do to grow bigger onions and if they should put Epsom salt on their tomatoes to help them grow more?

A. These onions are growing 3 inches apart, they should be spaced out more for larger sized onions. Place plants or sets 1-6″ apart in the rows, and 12-24″ between rows. For bulb production, plant onions in early spring. The number of leaves that form prior to bulbing determine the ultimate onion size. Since bulbing in each cultivar is triggered by a specific daylength, early planting is the most effective method of increasing bulb size, by allowing more time for leaves to form. If the onions do not grow well before bulb induction, the final bulb size may be smaller than desired. Avoid sets more than ¾ inch in diameter because they are likely to produce seed stalks.

As for the Epsom salt on tomatoes, no you should not apply this to your soil when you plant tomatoes. Our soils have a sufficient amount of magnesium and sulfate, which are the 2 ingredients in Epsom salt, so there is no need to apply more. If you need fertilizer, use a general fertilizer from the nursery or garden center.

12. A caller has a Japanese maple that was injured last May when the leaves curled up and fell off. The leaves never regrew through the summer last year. Will it come out of it?

 A: If it happened that early in the year last year and didn’t put on new leaves, it may be dead. Give it time this spring to green up. You can check if the tree is still alive by scraping the bark on a branch, if there is green underneath it is still alive, if there is brown it is dead.

13. What can you do to manage windmill grass?

A: Windmill grass is a perennial weed. You can use roundup and overseed or use a product containing mesotrione or Tenacity that will not harm your turf. Use the Tenacity in the late spring.

14. This caller wanted to know what to use for a pre-emergent herbicide in a strawberry patch?

A: Preen that is labeled for use in a vegetable garden would be allowed in a strawberry patch. The best control for weeds in strawberries would be to use mulch.

15. Can you use plants to repel insects?

A: Some plants may deter a few insects for a short time, but no, the plants are not concentrated enough to work against the insect pests.

16. A caller has an arborvitae that turned brown on the North side last fall. Will it be ok?

A: This could be due to bagworms or due to environmental stress. Arborvitae trees don’t like the sudden cool down in the fall and it can cause part or all of the plant to die quickly. Unfortunately, if the tree has turned brown all the way back into the trunk, the tree will not regrow on that section. Removal and replacement may be a better option for this plant.

17. This caller wanted to know when they can reseed their lawn and with what?

A: Mid to late April is the best time to reseed a lawn in Southeast Nebraska. Reseed with 100% Turf-type tall fescue or 100% Kentucky bluegrass or a 50% mix of each.

Squash bug-NH-pic monkey

18. A caller asked what to do about squash bugs in their vegetable garden?

A: Fall sanitation and cleaning up the garden will help a lot to reduce the eggs in the soil around your garden. When they do start coming out in the summer, you can use sevin, eight, or bifenthrin to control them. You will have to spray every 10-14 days through the growing season. Watch the Pre-Harvest Interval to know when you can harvest after spraying a chemical on your plants. You can also smash or remove the eggs you see which are tiny, football-shaped bronze colored eggs on the underside of the leaves typically found in the crotch of the leaf veins.

Yard and Garden: March 31, 2017

Yard & Garden for blog, 2017

This is the Q&A for the Yard and Garden show for March 31, 2017. Yard and Garden Live is a call-in radio show I do on KUTT 99.5 FM from 10-11:30 am and it will run through July 28, 2017. It can also be found on kutt995.com for online listening. If you missed a show or just want to read through the questions, I have written them all in my blog and will continue to do so throughout the season.

Guest Host: Natalia Bjorklund, Nebraska Extension Educator in Dodge County

1. The first question was when can we begin applying crabgrass preventer and fertilizer to our lawns this spring?

A. These are both best applied in late April to early May. Crabgrass will not germinate until the soil temperatures are consistently at 55-60 degrees Fahrenheit.

2. A caller wanted to know if he should mulch his asparagus and if he can use ash wood mulch around his asparagus?

A. Yes, mulch is one of the best ways to manage weeds in an asparagus patch. Ash wood chips would be fine. You do want to avoid Walnut wood chips because walnuts produce juglone which is a chemical produced by the tree to act as a weed control for nearby plants. This helps walnut trees with competition in the wild.

3. This caller has a goldenrod that has grown too large and messy for the area where it is planted. How can it be killed and what Goldenrod would be a better choice for a less messy plant?

A. 2,4-D or simple hand removal should kill the plant. When purchasing a Goldenrod plant in the future, any of the varieties would be better than the straight species. Fireworks is a nice, open goldenrod. Wichita Mountains and Baby Blue would be good choices as well.

4. Is it too early to transplant hostas? When should you cut back warm season grasses?

A. Wait a couple of weeks to transplant the hostas until the soil has warmed up a little more. You can cut back the ornamental grasses anytime now. It is better to get the old growth cut off before growth resumes so you don’t cut off the new growth. For ease of cleanup with the ornamental grasses, wrap string or twine around the plant before cutting off the old materials so it stays together when taking to the compost pile.

5. A caller wanted to know how and when to prune roses?

A. Wait until a little later into April to start pruning them. It depends on the type of rose to know how to prune them. This sounds like a climbing rose which can be pruned back about 1/2 to reduce the size. Wait until they start greening up to know which areas of the canes have died back, the dieback should be removed as well. If the canes are long and lean over mowing areas or other things, they can be tied up to a trellis.

6. This caller wanted to know how to get rid of cockleburs?

A. While talking with the caller, it came up that the plant had very small yellow flowers on it and there were spines over the plant except right at the soil surface. This plant is in fact buffalobur, not cocklebur. These are easily pulled up if you pull where there are no spines. A 2,4-D product could also be used if there was a large amount of them in the lawn.

buffalobur, Howard F Schwartz, Colorado State Univ, Bugwood

Buffalobur plant from Howard F. Schwartz, Colorado State University, Bugwood.org

7. A caller wanted to know if they should water in their crabgrass control?

A. The label will explain to you how a product should be applied for best efficacy. Always read and follow the label instructions to apply correctly. For many of the crabgrass preventers, they would need to be watered in, but again, check the label to be sure.

8. When should asparagus be fertilized?

A. Apply a general fertilizer or a composted manure to the bed after the last harvest or sometime in the fall.

9. This caller has mulberries growing in the windbreak. After they are cut down, what kind of stump treatment should be done to keep them from regrowing?

A. 2,4-D concentrate should be used as a stump treatment. This will take multiple applications and will be more effective if done in the fall. Each time the 2,4-D is reapplied it should be applied into newly drilled holes or to a freshly cut area of the stump.

10. A caller has cedars growing in their landscape. Under the cedars there is bare ground. What can they plant in that area to avoid weeds coming in?

A. The cedars are going to keep that area quite dark and the cedars will take the majority of the water in the soil so mulch would be a good alternative. If plants are desired, use a shade tolerant groundcover such as wintercreeper or vinca vine or perennial plants such as bleeding hearts, hostas, coral bells, jacob’s ladder, and others.

11. This caller has tiny cedar trees coming up throughout the lawn. How can they be controlled?

A. Cut them off at ground level. If a cedar is cut below any lateral growth it will not regrow. Mowing over them wouldn’t be low enough.

3-step pruning cut

Proper pruning cut, University of Missouri Extension

12. When is the best time to prune a maple tree that had a branch break in a storm?

A. As soon as the storm has passed and it is safe to do so, you should remove a branch that broke in the storm. If the damage occurred in a winter storm, let the ice and snow melt off first. Then, hire a certified arborist to come out and make a good pruning cut so that the tree can seal off the wound quickly and fully.

13. A caller has a hibiscus tree that is turning yellow and many of those yellow leaves are falling off the tree. It was moved indoors during the winter months in an area of the house with low sunlight. What is wrong with it and will it survive?

A. Hibiscus plants would need more sunlight than what it has received through the winter. It should be fine once it gets more sunlight. As the days get warmer, you can move it outdoors for more intense sunlight. It should be fine once it gets moved to better growing conditions.

14. This caller has a weeping willow tree that they would like to prune up a little. When can they prune it?

A. The weeping branches shouldn’t be pruned up too much or they could lose their weeping habit. Willows tend to have a heavy sap flow in the spring if they are pruned then, so it would be best to wait until later fall to prune a willow.

15. This caller has grasses that are coming up among the gravel paths around his daylily patch. What can he use to prevent those plants from coming up?

A. Preen is a great way to stop the germination of annual weeds, such as many of our weedy grass species. If they come up before the preen gets put down or if they grow as a perennial weed, you can use a post-emergent herbicide. If it is a grass that is growing out of place among daylilies, you can use Grass-B-Gon or a similar product to kill grasses.

henbit, steve dewey, Utah State Univ, Bugwood

Photo of henbit is from Steve Dewey, Utah State University, Bugwood.org

16. What can be done to manage henbit?

A. At this time of the year, there is nothing very effective at controlling henbit. Henbit is a winter annual plant, meaning that it germinates in the fall and flowers and produces seed in the spring. It dies with the summer heat. As we are now seeing the purple flowers from henbit, there is no need to control what you are seeing. The seed is already present in the lawn for next year and what you would be spraying will die soon. You can hand pull it now and spray with a 2,4-D product late in the fall.

17. This caller has moon flowers that had a lot of hornworms on them last summer. What can be done this year to reduce the number of hornworms?

A. Just because there were hornworms there last year doesn’t necessarily mean you will have a lot this year. Hornworms are sporadic pests. They are easily controlled by hand removal. You can also use sevin or eight or any other general insecticide. Use Bt to protect other pollinators as Bt is only harmful to insects in the order Lepidoptera which includes butterflies and moths.

18. What do you do for bindweed in a vegetable garden?

A. If you haven’t planted yet this spring, you can roundup the plants before you prepare the soil for the summer vegetables. The plants will probably still be a problem later in the year as this is a difficult pest to control. When it comes back in the summer, you can carefully use roundup through the growing season. You can paint the glyphosate product onto the leaves of the bindweed avoiding spraying the desired plants.

Yard and Garden: May 27, 2016

Yard & Garden for blog

This is the Q&A for the Yard and Garden show for May 27, 2016. Yard and Garden Live is a call-in radio show I do on KUTT 99.5 FM from 10-11:30 am and it will run through August 5, 2016. It can also be found on kutt995.com for online listening. If you missed a show or just want to read through the questions, I have written them all in my blog and will continue to do so throughout the season.

Guest Host: Dick Campbell, Owner of Campbell’s Nursery in Lincoln

1. The first question of the day came via email. A listener wanted to know how to control clover in their lawn?

A. Clover is best managed in the fall months when it is pulling nutrients from the leaves into the roots, it will take the chemical into the roots as well. Products with triclopyr work best, but 2,4-D will work as well. Make 2-3 applications in September and October for best control.

Mallow, Phil Westra, Co State Univ, Bugwood

Common Mallow photo by Phil Westra, Colorado State University, Bugwood.org

2. A walk-in question was for identification of a weed.

A. This weed is mallow. It is a difficult weed that will move throughout our gardens. It can be controlled with a careful application of Glyphosate (Roundup). Be careful not to spray any other plants with the glyphosate product.

3. A caller wanted to know when she can transplant daylilies and Iris?

A. The daylily could be transplanted now. It would be best to move these in the spring or in the fall, but daylilies are a tough plant and would be fine if moved now as long as they are kept well watered when it is hot because the root system isn’t developed at the new location yet. Iris would be best if transplanted in the fall.

4. A caller has earthworms making his lawn uneven. What can be done to control those?  This caller also wanted to know if he can water houseplants with water that goes through a water softener?

A. Earthworms are very beneficial to our soils as they reduce compaction and add organic matter back to our soils. The damage from them is only seen for a couple of weeks in the spring with rains. If you can deal with it for a short time, it is best to avoid treating for them. If you have to treat, Sevin insecticide does have some management capabilities for your lawn. As for watering the houseplants with water from a water softener, it is best to use water prior to the softener due to the increase of salts in the water.

5. This caller wants to know how far away from the house a shade plant should be planted? She also wants to know how she can manage grass in Iris’?

A. Spacing the tree from the house depends on the tree chosen and what the full size of that tree is. For many of the oak or maple shade trees, it is best to go 25-35 feet or farther from the house to ensure no problems develop as the tree grows. The grass in the Iris bed can be controlled with Grass-B-Gon.

6. A caller has a cherry tree that the top broke off but it is still attached to the main trunk. Can it be saved?

A. There is no way to re-attach a broken off branch. This branch will have to be removed. Because this is the only branch that is still producing leaves and cherries, the tree should be removed and replaced.

7. A caller has 2 rhubarb patches that were damaged badly by hail. The leaves look terrible. Should those leaves be removed or left on the plant?

A. If there are new leaves growing below the damaged leaves, the damaged leaves can be removed. However, if those damaged leaves are all that is alive on the plant right now, they should be left on the plant until new leaves begin to grow so that the plant can still grow and build nutrients for next spring.

8. A sample was brought in of a trumpet vine with many little insect all over the stem, leaves, and flowers. The plant has been sprayed with Sevin with no control. What can be done for this trumpet vine?

A. Sevin is not an effective method of control for aphids. In high populations you can use Eight or Malathion. Aphids are not very damaging to our plants and they are fairly short lived. Given time, predatory insects will move onto the aphids to control them without chemicals.

9. This caller was looking into planting apple trees and found there is a disease called cedar-apple rust. Is this a concerning disease here and what should be done to avoid problems with it?

A. Yes, cedar-apple rust is a damaging problem for apple trees. The spores can spread up to 2 miles, so it is best to plant a resistant apple tree cultivar. It is also good to look for cultivars that are resistant to apple scab. For choosing your cultivar, here is a publication from Purdue that lists common apple tree varieties and their disease susceptibility: Disease Susceptibility of Common Apple Cultivars

10. A sample was brought in of a tulip tree with leaves that are puckered and rolled downward. What would be the problem with this tree?

A. This tree has aphids on the underside of the leaves that are sucking the juices out of the leaves. Aphids are not terribly damaging to our plants and are fairly short lived. In high populations you can use Eight or Malathion.

11. Is there a dry granular weed killer for the lawn? When is the time to move gooseberries, iris, peonies, and rhubarb?

A. Fertilome is a good dry, granular weed killer. This is best applied early in the morning so it will stick to the leaf blades with the morning dew. Gooseberries should be moved after dormancy. Iris and peonies should be moved in the fall, typically in September when the tops begin to turn yellow. The rhubarb should be moved after they are dormant in the fall or early spring.

12. This caller has asparagus that has been planted in this location for many years and is now dying out. She fertilizes 2-3 times per year with a general fertilizer. What is causing this problem and can it be fixed? She also wants to know if she can use canning salt or Epsom salt in her garden? And, finally, she wants to know what to do for the aphids on her honeysuckle?

A. Asparagus will die out due to age. It would be beneficial to dig it up this fall after it goes dormant and divide the plants to replant as individual clumps. When replanting, sprinkle some bone meal in the hole to help with fertility. As for using epsom salt in the garden, this is not necessary. Epsom salt is magnesium sulfate which is in good supply in Nebraska soils. If nutrients are necessary in your garden, it is best to use a general purpose fertilizer. Canning salt can harm your plants and damage the soil. It is not a recommended practice to use any type of salt in your garden. As for the honeysuckle aphids, those should be controlled with Eight or Malathion. The aphids on honeysuckle can cause witches broom to the plant so they should be controlled.

13. Do raspberries and blackberries need to be grown on a trellis?

A. Yes, a trellis or an espalier would be a good way to grow them. Here is a good guide to growing raspberries and blackberries from Missouri Extension

14. Can red and black raspberries be planted together?

A. Don’t plant them within 20 feet of each other or they will cross pollinate and the fruits will not taste as good.

15. A caller has rhubarb that is shooting up stalks with seeds on them. What should be done with those?

A. Those seed stalks should be removed. Cut the stalk off at the ground. If left the plant will put energy into producing seed that should be stored for leaf and stalk production.

16. The last caller of the day has a mandevilla plant that is growing outdoors in a pot with a trellis. The leaves are now turning yellow and black. What is causing this and how can it be managed?

A. This is a moisture issue. The heavy rains this year are causing a leaf fungus to occur. A rose and flower systemic containing a fungicide can be applied to the plant to help reduce the disease.

Yard and Garden: April 15, 2016

Yard & Garden for blogThis is the Q&A for the Yard and Garden show for April 15, 2016. Yard and Garden Live is a call-in radio show I do on KUTT 99.5 FM from 10-11:30 am and it will run through August 5, 2016. It can also be found on kutt995.com for online listening. If you missed a show or just want to read through the questions, I have written them all in my blog and will continue to do so throughout the season.

Guest Host: Jeff Culbertson, UNL Landscape Services

1. The first caller of the day has asparagus that she planted last Spring. What needs to be done with the plant now?

A. Light harvest can be done the second growing season and then full harvesting can begin the third season. Mulch it now to keep weeds down, herbicide sprays are not able to be safely used too close to growing asparagus. Cut the plants back in the fall after they have grown well all season. Fertilizer can be applied now or in the fall.

2. How do you control moles in the lawn? How do you control grubs in the lawn?

A. For mole control, see this guide from the Internet Center for Wildlife Damage Management: http://icwdm.org/handbook/mammals/mam_d51.pdf Make sure that you have found an active run area before implementing any traps by stomping the mounds down for a couple of days prior to setting the trap. For grub control, the best option is to apply a product containing Imidacloprid around the third week of June.

3. This caller from the Southern part of the United States said that it is difficult to grow asparagus in the south. Is this due to the lack of dormancy in the south compared to what we have in Nebraska?

A. Yes, asparagus would need to have a rest period that occurs during our winter in Nebraska. However, the roots are also prone to root rot problems, so it might be that your soil could be too high of clay that isn’t allowing the asparagus roots to dry out enough.

4. Another caller has Iris that they have sprayed with Sevin for iris borers that are always a problem. Is this the best product and when should she be applying it? Also, she applied lime to the plants and now they are a lime green color instead of the deep green they are supposed to be. What is causing this discoloration?

A. Lime is used for acidic soils to raise the pH. In Nebraska, most of our soils are heavy clay and therefore already have a high pH. The addition of the lime to the soils in this case is causing chlorosis on these iris plants. It will work through over time, but for a couple of years the iris may look a little tired. The Iris borers have not shown up yet, but a treatment with an imidacloprid, permethrin, or bifenthrin soon or just as the larvae come out would be ideal for control.

5. This caller is wondering what the timing is for fertilizer with crabgrass pre-emergent herbicide? He is also wondering how to control bindweed in bromegrass?

A. Anytime in the next week or 2 would be ideal for fertilizer and crabgrass pre-emergent use this year. The soil temperatures are at 54.9 degrees Fahrenheit for the 7 day average. Crabgrass will germinate at temperatures between 55-60 degrees Fahrenheit, so you can begin applying your control methods anytime now until the end of the month for best control. The bindweed can be controlled with trimec  if used 2-3 times per summer. Keep the bindweed mowed to prevent flowering from occurring to reduce the amount of seed left in the grass.

6. A caller has cedar trees that were recently pruned from the bottom up. What would be a good grass to grow under these trees?

A. A fescue grass would grow well in this shady environment. Also, a nice groundcover such as purple leaf wintercreeper would be a good alternative to grass to reduce mowing under the tree and to grow better in the shade of the tree.

7. This caller from Hickman has a cherry tree. Every year they mow off many “little trees” that grow up and around the cherry tree. Is there anything else to do to reduce the occurrence of these trees?

A. Suckering occurs with many different tree species. These suckers may be growing off of the roots of the main tree so chemicals should not be used or else you may end up killing the desired tree as well. Cutting them off or mowing over them before they grow too large would be the best options for control.

8. This caller has fruit trees. He is wondering if a product called “fruit tree drench” for insects would be ok?

A. Not knowing the active ingredients in this product makes it hard to answer the question. Systemic insecticides are not usually safe for use in plants that are edible because a systemic insecticide will move throughout the entire plant, including into the edible parts. It is suggested to do more research on the safety of the product or to move to a spray type of insecticide that is not systemic to reduce the health hazards that may be a problem with systemic insecticides.

9. Another caller has an apple tree that is 7-8 years old. The last 3 years it has produced nice apples but they are rotten inside. Now there are not many apples that are not rotten on the inside. What can be done for this?

A. Sanitation is going to be key for controlling this disease, known as black rot of apples. A orchard fruit tree spray program can be used to minimize the damage as well. Pruning may need to be done to remove any branches that are dead or diseased.

10. A caller wanted to start a new strawberry patch. How far should the plants be spaced in the garden and what should be done to the soil for improvements?

A. Till in compost and topsoil for increased organic matter and reducing compaction in the soil. Space the plants 1 foot apart.

11. This caller has a maple tree that is not budding out and has not yet lost the leaves from last spring. Will it survive?

A. Some maples, such as the sugar maples, have not yet leafed out for this spring. Use the fingernail test to scratch the bark lightly on smaller branches to see if there is green underneath the bark. Green under the bark means the tree is still alive and waiting to come out of winter dormancy, brown under the bark means it died over the winter.

12. A caller wants to know about the “spray on grass”. Will it work for overseeding?

A. Should work ok, but check with the types of grass seed included in these cans. Many of these mixes have perennial rye which doesn’t last long in Nebraska environments. Also, check for the amount of weed seed found in the mixture.

13. Is it too late to thin Iris plants?

A. The best time to transplant and divide iris plants is in the fall. Use a garden fork to lift them from the ground. Look for borer holes, and then replant them making sure to not plant them too deeply.

14. What is the best advice for improving soils for growing watermelons?

A. Lighter soils are best for growing watermelons. Add compost to improve the fertility.

15. A gentleman has cherry trees, apricot trees, and peach trees. What type of mulch should be applied to help keep the trees watered?

A. Organic mulches should be used, such as the wood chips. They need to be applied at a uniform depth of 2-3 inches in a ring around the trees that is at least 2-3 feet wide around the tree. Water the trees for about 45 minutes every 10-14 days, more may be necessary during the hot, dry periods of the summer. Use a soil probe or long screwdriver to see if the trees need water. Push the probe into the soil up to 12-18 inches deep, if there is resistance any time while pushing into the ground, the trees need water.

grape hyacinth, ricky layson photography, bugwood

Grape Hyacinth photo from Ricky Layson, Ricky Layson Photography, Bugwood.org via Creative Commons License.

16. A caller has grape hyacinth growing in her lawn. What can be done for management?

A. Mow it off. This is a short lived annual plant that is close to the end of its lifetime for this year. There is no need to use chemicals to control this plant.

Yard and Garden: June 19, 2015

Yard and Garden Green Logo

This is the Q&A for the Yard and Garden show for June 19, 2015. Yard and Garden Live is a call-in radio show I do on KUTT 99.5 FM from 10-11:30 am and it will run through July 31, 2015. It can also be found on kutt995.com for online listening. If you missed a show or just want to read through the questions, I have written them all in my blog and will continue to do so throughout the season.

Guest Host: Dick Campbell from Campbell’s Nursery in Lincoln, NE

1. A walk-in guest has ants in her house. How can they be controlled?

A: Liquid ant baits work best. One good choice is the Terro bait stations. Another helpful tip is to spray around the outside of the house on the outside of the wall where most ants are found. The little black ant and odorous house ant are common in homes right now.

2. A caller has Linden trees that are covered with moths right now. What can be done to reduce the populations for outdoor activities?

A: A contact insecticide spray will work for the moths, such as malathion. These products do not have a very long residual, so they need to be reapplied. However, be very careful with insecticides on linden trees and other flowering plants to not harm bees and other pollinator insects. Spray at dusk to avoid spraying the bees.

3. A gentleman has a snowball bush viburnum that just finished blooming for the spring, can it be pruned now?

A:  Now that the blooms are fading from a spring bloom, it would be a great time to prune the shrub. It is best to remove the largest canes of the shrub all the way back to the ground, up to one-third of the plant in one growing season. Leave the rest of the canes as they are or remove a portion of their height, if necessary.

4. A gentleman has moths in large populations on his “bug zapper” every morning. Is he bringing the moths in? Should the “bug zapper” be moved from near his plants?

A: Moths are attracted to lights, but you aren’t bringing them in from far distances. You can move the “bug zapper” if it is near a regularly used door that causes problems with moths when going in and outside. They are not causing any harm to our plants.

5. When is the best time for grub control? And, is it past the time for crabgrass control?

A: Grub control is best done right now, during the third week of June. It is best to apply grub control when the adults are actively flying and mating. Crabgrass is still germinating, so crabgrass control can still be applied if none was applied earlier in the spring. If you do a split application of crabgrass control, now is a good time to do the second application for the spring.

6. A caller has a spruce tree that has been slowly dying for a couple of years, it has now lost 60-70% of its needles. If they remove the tree, will something else grow where that tree is removed?

A: Yes, the stump will cause no problems to a new plant. You may want to plant the new tree 5-10 feet away from the stump to avoid the root system, but otherwise no problems will occur. The needles on the ground may lower the pH of the soil, but in a clay soil, the amount is so low to cause no problems if not help the plant.

7. A caller is moving from one house to another. The house they are leaving has a great asparagus patch. Can that be transplanted to the new home?

A: It is best to move asparagus in the fall when it is going into dormancy. Asparagus will transplant well, but you will need to wait until the third season after transplanting before heavy harvesting can resume. A new plant would take the same amount of time and may be better suited for a moving condition to ensure it is planted at the correct time of the year.

8. A gentleman has a crabapple tree that he removed from a landscaping berm. Can he use Tordon on the stump to keep it from regrowing?

A: No! Tordon is not labeled for use in a landscape setting so it should never be used in a lawn or garden. This product can move out into the root system of other plants and it has a residual for up to 5 or 6 years where it can still cause problems to the neighboring plants. Be sure to always read and follow label instructions on all pesticides as the label is the law.

9. A caller has sweet corn that is tasseling but it is only 3 feet tall. What would cause this?

A: Some hybrids of corn are shorter. If that is not the case, it would be due to environmental stress. When a plant is stressed they may try to produce fruit sooner than they should for the size of the plant.

10. A gentleman has a 60-year-old spruce tree that is dying on the west side of the plant. What is causing this?

A: Look for white sap on the trunk which would be an indication of canker. This is likely due to environmental stress from the quick drop in temperatures last fall. Any branches that are dead can be pruned off and it should regrow new branches eventually.

11. A lady had a birch and 2 large maples planted last fall. This spring the birch is slow to leaf out and still has not leafed out on the top of the plant. What is causing this?

A: Birch trees face a lot of death in the first year after being transplanted. Scratch the bark of the branches to see if their is any green, live, growth or if it is brown and therefore dead. If it is brown, call the nursery to get a replacement tree planted.

12. Another caller also has 2 maples that were planted last fall and are dead on top. What is causing that? She also has hollyhock rust, is that too early to be seen?

A: They didn’t get enough root growth developed prior to the drop in temperatures last fall. If they have no green in the cambium layer, the caller should call her nursery for a replacement tree. As for the Hollyhock rust, that is due to the rainy weather we have seen this spring.

13. A caller has blue spruce trees that had flood water up and around their bottom branches for 2 days and are now turning brown. Will the trees come out of this?

A: Spruce trees don’t like too much moisture. However, don’t give up yet, give them time to come back and grow out of the problems from flood damage. It is too early to tell if these are long-term issues for the plants.

Yard and Garden: June 12, 2015

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This is the Q&A for the Yard and Garden show for June 12, 2015. Yard and Garden Live is a call-in radio show I do on KUTT 99.5 FM from 10-11:30 am and it will run through July 31, 2015. It can also be found on kutt995.com for online listening. If you missed a show or just want to read through the questions, I have written them all in my blog and will continue to do so throughout the season.

Guest Host: Natalia Bjorklund, Extension Educator in Dodge County

1. This caller has asparagus that is going to seed and is growing very large, does it need to be left up and growing all year?

A: It is best to allow the plants to grow all summer. This will allow it to build up nutrients to be used next spring to get the plant growing early in the season. It can be cut back to the ground late in the fall.

2. A caller had rabbits that eat his tomato plants off at the ground level. Will these plants grow back or should he replant?

A: This late in the season it would be best to replant the tomato plants. It is also advised that a rabbit fence is put up around the garden. To keep rabbits out of a garden, the fence needs to be at least 2 feet tall.

3. A lady has Black-eyed Susan’s growing in her garden for a couple of years now and they have gotten black spots on the leaves of the plants. She put sevin on it and the plant still has black spots on it.

A: This would be a fungal leaf spot disease that is common on many asters including Black-eyed Susan. Sevin is an insecticide that would only be affective on insects and not on fungi. Cleaning up the garden in the fall and removing infected leaves throughout the growing season will help reduce the spread of this disease. Also, ensure that when watering is necessary, it is applied to the base of the plant rather than over the top of the leaves. This is not a disease that typically needs to be treated for as it causes only minimal damage to the plant.

4. A woman who is moving from her home would like to know if it will be alright for her to transplant her iris and lilies to her new home at this time of the year?

A: The best time to transplant these would be in the fall, but if necessary, they can be transplanted now. Just take time to give these plants extra care and ensure that they are getting sufficient water throughout the season as they will not have a well-developed root system to deal with the hot and dry conditions we typically see in the summer months.

5. When is the best time to transplant peonies and how deep of a root system needs to be taken with the plants?

A: Fall is the best time to transplant peonies. When transplanting any plant take as much of the rootball as is possible and backfill with the same soil that was removed from the new location when the hole is dug. For peonies, pay close attention to where they are planted currently and make sure that they are not planted any deeper in their new location or they will not bloom again until they are lifted to higher in the soil profile.

6. A caller’s husband sprayed her garden area with Roundup. When can she safely plant this into a vegetable garden?

A: It will be fine to replant. As long as you wait 3 days to replant after roundup, or any glyphosate product, it will not harm the crops you plant on it.

7. A gentleman is growing purple onions and now they have started to produce seedheads. What should be done about this, is it a concern?

A: Cut off the seedheads or they will take too much energy to put into the seedheads and not enough into the onion.

8. A gentleman has a tree that is suckering. Can he spray anything on those to stop the growth of so many?

A: No, these suckers are coming up from the roots of the main tree. Anything sprayed on the suckers will translocate into the entire tree. The best control for suckers on a tree is to continually prune them off throughout the growing season.

2014-06-12 16.08.12

9. A caller has a spirea that is 3-4 feet tall. Is this as large as they should get? When should they be pruned for maximum growth?

A: Spireas typically grow to 3-4 feet, so this is probably about full grown size. Some varieties will grow larger and some will grow smaller, it depends on the variety, but most commonly they are found in the 3-4 foot range. If it is a summer blooming spirea prune it in the late winter or early spring just before growth begins. If it is a variety of spirea that blooms in the spring, prune it in the late spring, just after it has finished blooming for the year.

10. A caller has tomato plants that were planted in a location 75 feet away from where they are typically planted because they always see leaf curling and they are still curling up in the new location. What is causing this and how can it be remedied?

A: This could be a herbicide drift issue which will cause cupping, curling, and distortion of the leaves and stems. It could also be a physiological leaf roll issue that is common this year due to the wet, cooler weather. The plant will grow out of either of these issues to not be problematic to the plants later in the growing season.

11. A lady was wondering when hibiscus can be transplanted?

A: It can be transplanted either now or in the fall when you can see the plant because it is late to emerge in the spring.

12. A caller has broccoli growing in his garden that now has developed holes in the leaves. Will sevin or eight work for this problem?

A: Yes, this is probably due to cabbage looper which can be controlled with a general insecticide such as sevin or eight.

13. A gentleman has tomatoes that have curled up leaves that look like they have been sprayed. Is it a spray drift issue?

A: Tomatoes are very sensitive to spray drift so it could be that. It could also be physiological leaf curl. Both of these problems will work their way out of the plants.

14. The last caller of the day has potatoes that are turning yellow and wilting over. What is causing that?

A: This is probably due to too much moisture. Check the potatoes for rot.

Yard and Garden: May 29, 2015

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This is the Q&A for the Yard and Garden show for May 29, 2015. Yard and Garden Live is a call-in radio show I do on KUTT 99.5 FM from 10-11:30 am and it will run through July 31, 2015. It can also be found on kutt995.com for online listening. If you missed a show or just want to read through the questions, I have written them all in my blog and will continue to do so throughout the season.

Guest Host: John Fech, Extension Educator in Douglas & Sarpy Counties

1. A caller had fine webbing on her tomatoes, what is it and how can it be controlled? She also wondered about using blossom set on her tomatoes?

A: The fine webbing on the tomatoes would be spidermites. These can be controlled with a strong spray of water on the plants to knock the mites off and kill them. As for the blossom set, is not recommended as it does not have strong research to back the effectiveness of it.

2. A lady had a river birch and a dogwood shrub that are not leafing out at the top. Why is this?

A: The plants are going through environmental stress. This spring has been warm followed by very cold to warmer again and now just cool, cloudy, rainy weather. That follows 3 years of stressful environmental conditions starting with the drought in 2015. Many of our plants are experiencing a degree of winterkill due to these events, where the top of the plant is not leafing out but the bottom of the plant is. Many of our plants will eventually fully leaf out or just have some dead branches through them. With the dogwood, those dead branches can be pruned back, but wait 2 more weeks to see if any more of the plant comes back. With the river birch, it is not advised to top a tree, so the pruning practices will be more difficult and it would be best to consult an arborist for that.

2015-05-29 07.56.43

3. A caller has an Austrian Pine where the new growth is browning and lighter green, whereas the rest of the tree is dark colored. What is wrong with it?

A: The needles at this point are not fully elongated due to the late spring events. Give the tree time to fully come out of the winter dormancy period to determine the color differences. If at that point there is still a problem, email me or your local extension office for more information.

4. This caller has a Japanese Lilac tree that has brown branches with no leaves on them. What should be done with those branches?

A: Scrape the branches with a fingernail or pocket knife to see if there is any green tissue under the bark in the cambium layer. If underneath is brown it is a dead branch. Either way, wait until around June 15 to see if the branches will come back from winter dormancy. If not, then the dead branches can be removed at that point. Don’t remove any live tissue from the tree at that time of the year.

5. A caller wanted to know if you can get multiple cuttings from a broccoli plant?

A: Broccoli is a tough plant to grow in Nebraska because in typical years it gets too hot too soon in the summer to provide an efficient harvest. It is suggested to grow broccoli as a fall crop. This year, however, is a good year for broccoli in the spring due to the slow warm up we have seen. As long as you only cut out the broccoli florets, you can leave the leaves and provide additional side buds that can be harvested for broccoli meals.

6. This caller has a large silver maple in their yard and now they are finding multiple small seedlings of maples all around their landscape. How can those seedlings be controlled?

A: Mowing them off is the best practice or pruning them out while they are small and easier to control. Do not spray them with any chemicals for control because they could be suckers coming up off of the roots of the main plant and any chemical applied to root suckers can kill the entire tree. These seedlings could also be from the seeds that fall from the trees in samaras that resemble helicopters, but determining the difference is very difficult and it is just easier to only cut the seedlings rather than treat them with a chemical and risk harming the main tree that is enjoyed in your yard.

7. This caller has cherry trees that have suckers coming out from the base of the plant. What can be done to control those?

A: These suckers will have to pruned off repeatedly with pruners not the lawnmower. They are attached to the main plant and any chemical attempts would harm and possibly kill the main cherry tree. Typically, trees will begin to sucker when they are stressed. Ensure that the tree is well taken care of and healthy by providing it with a mulch ring 2-3 inches deep and as wide as they can make it. Water the tree at a slow trickle for 30-60 minutes one time a week during the hot part of the summer and only once every two weeks during the spring and fall.

8. This woman was wondering if now was the time to prune her snowball bush that is just finishing up the blooming period? She also wanted to know if this was the time to apply weed and feed to her lawn?

A: Now would be a great time to prune that spring blooming shrub. The rule of thumb is to prune spring blooming shrubs after they finish blooming for the year and prune summer blooming shrubs late in the winter before growth begins for the year. Now is the time to fertilize your lawn, but avoid using weed and feed products. The problem with a weed and feed product is that the weed control part of that needs to stay on the leaves and the feed portion needs to stay off of the leaves. It is a better practice to fertilize the entire lawn with only a fertilizer and spot spray with 2,4-D products only on the weeds in the lawn.

9. This caller’s daughter lives in Lincoln where flooding was a problem and she has a drainage ditch that has caused water to sit and is now concerned with mosquitoes. What can be done?

A: If the water is stagnant and there is no way to remove the water, it is best to use larvicides that are found in mosquito dunks that can be purchased at many box stores and garden centers. These mosquito dunks are not harmful to other wildlife or people.

10. This lady has a tree that has deer rubs on it. She placed a tree wrap tube on the tree and was curious about removal of the tree wrap.

A: The tree wraps and tubes are a great way to keep deer from damaging young, thin barked trees. They should only be left on for the winter months and then removed during the spring and summer. If left on they can girdle the tree if it gets too tight on the trunk and it can be a location for insects and diseases to get into the tree.

tree wrapping

11. This caller has Ponderosa Pines that have brown needles that cover 80-90% of the tree. It is only a problem on 2 of the many Ponderosa Pines that are all planted together. They have been planted for about 5 years and have shown this browning over the entire tree for 2-3 years. What can be done for this problem?

A: This could be a root issue dealing with stem girdling roots or a watering issue. It is hard to determine, but might possibly be due to low watering. Water the plants slowly for 30-60 minutes weekly in the summer and once every two weeks during the spring and fall. These trees may not make it through, if it is a root issue digging them up after they have completely died would help solve the problem.

12. The final caller this week wanted to know how late in the season they should harvest their asparagus plants?

A: They do need a period through the summer to rest from being harvested so they can build sugars to help them get growing next spring. It is best to quit harvesting when the stalks develop ferns, when they get small and spindly, and/or when they get woody. This will give the plant plenty of time to recover from this years harvest and prepare for next years harvest.

Yard and Garden: May 22, 2015

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This is the Q&A for the Yard and Garden show for May 15, 2015. Yard and Garden Live is a call-in radio show I do on KUTT 99.5 FM from 10-11:30 am and it will run through July 31, 2015. It can also be found on kutt995.com for online listening. If you missed a show or just want to read through the questions, I have written them all in my blog and will continue to do so throughout the season.

Guest Host: Kevin Korus, Diagnostician for the UNL Plant & Pest Diagnostic Lab

1. A caller with a river birch that is 5-6 years old was planted with 3 trunks and now it has 5 trunks. Should those be removed or will it harm the tree?

A: River birch trees are commonly grown as a multi-trunked tree. If additional trunks appear, they can be left on or cut off with no problems for the tree, as long as they don’t grow too large before they are removed. If the trunks to be removed have grown to be 1/3 of the tree or more or the trunks are 1/2 the size or larger than the main trunk, you would not want to remove these as that would be removing too much of the tree in one growing season and can cause more problems to the tree than benefits. If they are not in the way, I would suggest leaving all 5 trunks.

2. A gentleman wanted to know how and when to prune blackberries and raspberries. He has raspberries that have died from the top downward on some branches with green growth at the base of the plant. What should he do about this?

A: The top dieback would likely be due to water stress or winterkill which occurs during the winter months when we see little moisture. As for general pruning, there is a great guide from the University of Missouri Extension to describe the many practices of pruning brambles, Pruning Raspberries, Blackberries, Gooseberries, Currants, and Elderberries.

3. This caller has amaryllis bulbs that were growing great and now the leaves are starting to turn yellow. What is the cause of this and how can she stop it from happening?

A: This plant is likely in need of a fertilizer treatment. They should receive regular fertilization with a houseplant fertilizer. Also make sure that the plant isn’t sitting in water. Amaryllis plants should be watered when the top two inches of soil are dry to the touch.

4. This caller has Weigela ‘Wine and Roses’ that she had trimmed last fall. Now one of them is only greening up at the bottom of the plant, why is this?

A: This plant is suffering from winterkill. As long as the bottom is greening up, the plant should be fine. Those dead branches can be removed back to green growth or back to the ground if there is no green on the branch at all. Remember to keep plants watered on the warm days when we face a dry winter like we did last year.

5. This caller was curious about rhubarb. How long in the year do you harvest rhubarb in the year or can you continue to harvest all year long? When should they be transplanted? What do you do when seed stalks appear on the plant?

A: You can harvest the plant until the plant begins to produce slender stalks. After that the plant needs to be left alone to replenish the sugars and nutrients to continue growing and produce next year. The stalks can be cut off or they can be pulled off. When the seed stalks appear on the plants, they should be removed. The production of seed stalks takes energy from the plant to make the seeds rather than leaving it to produce leaves and the stalks. Transplanting rhubarb is best done in the spring of the year. Avoid harvesting for the first growing season after transplanting and only do light harvest in the second season. By the third season, harvest can resume as normal. This is to allow the plant to get a good root system developed before loosing much of its leaf area.

6. This caller has a pin oak tree that is 45 years old. He added a mulch ring to the tree recently and wanted to know if rock mulch or wood chip mulch is better for the tree?

A: Any mulch is better than no mulch. Wood chip mulches keep the roots cooler and hold in more moisture than the rock mulches, but the rock mulches will not blow away or need to be replenished each year like the wood chip mulches. Either way keep the mulch only 2-3 inches deep.

7. This caller wanted to know how far apart to plant her asparagus? She planted hers 1.5 feet apart, is this too far apart?

A: Asparagus should be about 6-8 inches deep and 12-18 inches apart. There isn’t a problem with planting it too far apart, the problem would occur if they are planted too close together. Plants not spaced correctly can lead to disease problems.

Yard and Garden: April 24, 2015

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This is the Q&A for the Yard and Garden show for April 24, 2015. Yard and Garden Live is a call-in radio show I do on KUTT 99.5 FM from 10-11:30 am and it will run through July 31, 2015. It can also be found on kutt995.com for online listening. If you missed a show or just want to read through the questions, I have written them all in my blog and will continue to do so throughout the season.

Guest Host: Jeff Culbertson, Assistant Director of UNL Landscape Services

1. This caller wants to know why the water in her rain barrels is turning green and how to fix that problem?

A: The water should be used sooner from the rain barrels and not allowed to sit in it for very long periods of time. There is a great NebGuide on ‘Rainwater Harvesting with Rain Barrels‘. Algae can sometimes appear and can be reduced by:

  • Limit nutrient build-up in the barrel by reducing the amount of sediment and plant debris entering the barrel. These are sources of nutrients like phosphorous and nitrogen that promote algae. Clean roof gutters at least annually. If hosing out the roof gutter, remove the rain barrel before cleaning. Consider installing gutter screens along with using screens/filters before the barrel inlet.
  • Clean the barrel at least once a year to remove sediment.
  • Use dark-colored, painted, or opaque barrels to limit light.
  • Place rain barrels in a shady location when possible.

2. This caller had a willow that is leafing out from the bottom without any growth at the top of the tree. Is this normal or what is wrong with the tree?

A: This could be due to dieback from the winter which is being seen throughout the landscape this year. It is still early in the season so the tree could come out of it, so give it time to see if it comes back. Scrape off some of the bark with your fingernail to see if underneath is brown or green. Green is healthy growing tissue, brown is not. If it seems to be dead later in the season, you can prune out some of the dead branches and the tree may still survive.

3. When is the best time to dig cedar trees from the pasture to transplant them into a windbreak?

A: Now would be a good time to do this. Make sure they are small trees and that they are protected from deer and rabbits in their new location. Keep them well watered.

4. What is a good rhubarb fertilizer?

A: 12-12-12 or 10-10-10 would be a good general fertilizer to use or manure in the fall.

5. This caller wanted to know if Ponderosa Pine was still a recommended tree due to the threat from Pine wilt?

A: Ponderosa Pine is only mildly affected by pine wilt. Very few ponderosa pines have been killed due to the disease. It is still on the list of trees from ReTree Nebraska. Watch these trees for tip and needle blight, 2 common needle diseases, that can be easily treated with fungicides.

6. A caller has 2 trees in her windbreak that were planted about 8 years prior to a storm that has caused them to lean now. It has been a couple of years since the storm, but the trees are still leaning. Can this lean be fixed?

A: They will grow straighter over time and eventually straighten up somewhat. If the lean is too much, they will not overcome that.

7. This caller has been gradually replacing a plum hedge with Lilacs. What can he do to prevent disease and insect problems in the lilacs?

A: After about 2-3 years of initial growth, begin annually removing the largest, woodiest stems from the lilac shrubs. This will help keep the shrubs with younger, better producing wood and it will help keep the borers and scale away from the plants. As for disease control, just be sure to space the lilacs properly. Most full sized lilacs will get 3-4 feet wide so space them about 4 feet apart to reduce the overlapping of the branches and leaves which can lead to more disease problems.

8. A caller has a large asparagus bed that wasn’t cleaned up last fall. What care can be done for the asparagus now and in the future?

A: It would be best to clean the asparagus up one time a year, either in the fall or late winter just before spring growth begins. To help reduce weeds after that, spray the weeds while they are green and the asparagus hasn’t emerged for the year yet in the spring. Fertilize the planting bed either in the spring with general purpose fertilizer or in the fall with manure or both times.

9. This caller has a rose bush on an old property and wants to know how to propagate it or transplant some of it to their home?

A: Remove and transplant any suckers on the plant will work on an older rose variety that wouldn’t have been grafted. Anytime now is a great time to transplant a rose bush.

10. This gentleman has French Dwarf Lilacs and he was told not to trim them out. Is this true?

A: These can be cut back or caned out annually to keep them smaller and to help them produce more flowers.

11. A caller had stumps from trees that were cut down last year. The stumps were treated with Tordon. Can he use the mulch they will make from the stumps in his landscape or would the Tordon still be in the wood chips?

A: Wood chips that were treated with Tordon could still have that pesticide residue in the wood chips. It should not be used around plants. Disclaimer: Tordon should NOT be used in a landscape setting, it is against label instructions. Always read and follow pesticide labels. Remember: The label is the Law.

2015-04-15 11.03.06

12. This gentleman had cedars with the tips of the branches turning brown this year. What is causing that and what should be done for it?

A: This could be winter kill as that is showing up in many juniper species this spring. It may also be Kabatina, a disease of junipers. The brown can be cut out of the trees at a branch crotch. The trees should live.

13. This caller was looking for a shade tree for her front yard that is fast growing, stays around 20 feet tall and possibly provides flowers or good color to the landscape.

A: Chanticleer or Cleveland Select Pear would be good for spring color. Crabapples can also grow to 20 feet tall and would provide a great deal of color and scent in the spring. Japanese Tree Lilac is another good choice for a smaller tree.

14. This caller is planting strawberries and raspberries. What kind of care would she need to provide them?

A: Here is a good guide from Sarah Browning on Summer Berries-Raspberry and Blackberry to guide you through the raspberries. Heritage is a good raspberry variety choice. This is a good guide from Lancaster County Extension on strawberry care called Growing Strawberries.

15. This caller has a pin oak tree that has iron deficiency. She has used the iron plugs on the trees but she is curious if there is another choice that will work better and for a longer period of time on the pin oaks?

A: This tree will continue to have problems once it starts to show signs from Iron Deficiency and it will eventually die from this nutrient problem. She can try to have a professional due trunk injections which will last longer each time, but this will have to be continued for the remainder of this trees life.

16. This caller wanted to know how to prepare cut lilac flowers to last longer indoors?

A: Cut the flowers before they have opened on the plant. Make a new cut on the stem and change the water daily. Use a preservative in the water. The preservative can be either a store bought product or make your own mixture by dissolving 4 heaping teaspoons of cane sugar and 2 tablespoons of white distilled vinegar in one quart of warm water.

17. This caller wanted to control the dandelions in his yard and not the clover. Can a chemical be used for this?

A: Using spot sprays of 2,4-D when the weather is calm and the temperatures are below 80 degrees Fahrenheit for the day of application and the 2 days following would help reduce damage to the clover. The other option would be to dig or hand pull the dandelions. The chemicals that would work for dandelion would also work to kill clover.

Happy Arbor Day! Plant a Tree!!

Image Courtesy of Steven Katovich, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org

Image Courtesy of Steven Katovich, USDA Forest Service, Bugwood.org

Yard and Garden: April 3, 2015

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This is the Q&A for the Yard and Garden show for April 3, 2015. Yard and Garden Live is a call-in radio show I do on KUTT 99.5 FM from 10-11:30 am and it will run through July 31, 2015. It can also be found on kutt995.com for online listening. If you missed a show or just want to read through the questions, I have written them all in my blog and will continue to do so throughout the season.

Guest Host: Mark Harrell from the Nebraska Forest Service

1. Caller had grown tomatoes in the past that were growing in his basement and they were not growing well, what can he do to improve the growing conditions?

A: Increase the light intensity on the plants. Use one warm and one cool bulb in a utility light and keep that light 6 inches from the plants as they grow and keep the light on them for 14-16 hours per day. Also try to increase fertilizer use by applying it to the plants according to label directions. With new seedlings, use only at a half strength for the first few days after a plant has germinated.

2. Caller had Honeyberry Bushes that were growing for 3 years and they didn’t seem to have grown very much over these years, what might be causing this lack in growth? They are planted where the soil was brought in to build a building on.

A: It seems like the soil may be constricting root growth and then in turn would be restricting above-ground growth. It might be best to try to replant these in a location with less compacted soil.

3. A caller has a Euonymus shrub that is growing along the east side of her home had a growth along the stems that is furry or hairy, what might this growth be?

photo

Euonymus sarcoxie plant with aerial roots photo from caller.

A: It seems that this is a species of Euonymus, called Euonymus sarcoxie, which is a variety that vines. This furry appearance is actually aerial roots that is normal for this and many vining species of plants.

4. A walk-in client wanted to know what they can do for preparing their garden to reduce the number of squash bugs that attack their zucchini plants in the summer?

A: Cleaning up the garden space in the fall will reduce the overwintering site for these insects to help reduce the number the following year. For this spring, it will be best to look for the rusty colored eggs on the underside of the leaves of your zucchini, cucumber, and pumpkin plants and remove those leaves and throw them into a bucket of soapy water. Also, use chemicals through the growing season. Carbaryl, Permethrin, and Bifenthrin can be used throughout the growing season, alternating between all of these chemcials. Read and follow all label instructions and be sure to watch the post-harvest interval (PHI) to know when you can harvest after applying these chemicals.

5. A caller wanted to know when the best time to spray for borers on oak trees would be?

A: The best time to treat for oak borers would be the end of May to the beginning of June and it should be repeated 2 weeks after the first application.

6. A caller wanted to know what would be the best control for weeds in an asparagus plot?

A: Mulch is a very good control for weeds in asparagus gardens. There is also a preen that can be used on vegetable gardens. Glyphosate products, such as roundup, can be used very early in the spring before asparagus starts to grow and late in the fall after the asparagus plants have been snapped off to a level below the soil line. Sarah Browning has a great article on many weed management tactics for asparagus at: http://lancaster.unl.edu/hort/articles/2011/AsparagusWeeds.shtml

7. A caller wanted to know when the best time for fruit tree pruning would be and when to start spraying the orchard fruit tree sprays?

A: Fruit tree pruning is best done in February and March of the year. You should start spraying the fruit tree sprays as the buds begin to swell and on a 10-14 day schedule for the remainder of the growing season. Do not spray the trees during the period when they are blooming and being pollinated or you may kill or harm the bees and other pollinators needed for the fruits to show up.

8. A caller was starting seedlings indoors and the leaves were beginning to turn yellow. Why are they turning yellow and what can be done to improve this situation?

A: Be sure to fertilize these seedlings regularly with a water soluble fertilizer, according to the instructions on the label. Make sure to keep the lights 6 inches from the plants as they grow and keep the light on them for 14-16 hours per day.

9. A caller had a tree that was cut down last year and has many ants throughout the tree stump, even still after the tree has been cut down. Why is this and what can she do to reduce the ants?

A: These are probably carpenter ants that tunnel through decaying or rotting wood. They were not causing any harm to the tree and they are not a concern for nearby plants. If control is desired, sprinkle Carbaryl dust on the stump of the tree.

10. This caller had 2 questions. She had an arborvitae that rapidly went from green to brown and dead. What would cause this? She also had some junipers that turned completely brown from the bottom up but the inside was still green. What would cause this?

A: The arborvitae most likely is having problems due to dry conditions and possibly winterkill. Make sure this tree has a good mulch ring, only 2-3 inches deep, and keep the soil around it moist, but not wet. The junipers also appear to have environmental problems that have caused this issue. There was a rapid drop in temperatures last fall and a warm and dry winter which could cause problems to this plant and many evergreens.

11. A caller had zoysia grass in her yard that has been declining over the years and is not as dominant in her yard now as it used to. How can she fix this problem?

A: She can try to plug her yard with more zoysia grass to get it established again in those other areas where the cool season grasses and other weeds have come in. She would need to do weed control in those areas before trying the plugging and during the establishment period of the zoysia grass to reduce competition. The plugs should be placed 6-12 inches apart and it should be done in the late spring to early summer to allow for best establishment.

12. This caller is looking to move a rose bush to save it from an area planned to be transitioned into a vegetable garden. What is the best way to do this?

A: This can still be done yet this spring. He can prune it prior to moving it so it is more of a manageable size. Take as much of the rootball as is possible. Keep the shrub well watered at its new location and don’t plant it any deeper than what it is growing at now.

13. A caller wanted to know when the best time to plant potatoes would be?

A: Anytime now would be a good time to plant potatoes. Plant potatoes when the soil temperatures are around 40 degrees Fahrenheit.

14. A caller wanted to know when the best time to prune a smokebush would be?

A: Late winter is the best time to prune a smokebush.