Dandelion Control Should be Done Now

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Photo by Nic Colgrove

Weeds in the lawn will drive us crazy through the whole summer, but don’t forget about them yet. Fall is the best time to treat for broadleaf weeds, even though we don’t notice them as much now because they are done blooming for the year.

Perennial broadleaf weeds including dandelions, creeping Charlie or ground ivy, and clover are best controlled in the fall once the weeds have begun their preparations for winter. In the fall months, these perennial weeds will move sugars that they use for energy from the above ground portions of the plant down into the roots to store them for next spring. If they are sprayed during this phase of their lifecycle, they are more likely to take that herbicide down into the roots and kill the plants rather than just burn the tops off.

The cooler temperatures in the fall are better for turf and ornamental plants due to a reduction in volatilization. In the warm summer days, the herbicides we typically use on broadleaf weeds can turn into a gas and move to non-target plants, causing damage and in some cases even death. With the cooler temperatures, this is not a big concern because the common chemicals we use, such as 2,4-D and Dicamba, do not volatilize at temperatures below 80 degrees. Wind drift is still a concern, so always be sure to apply herbicides on days with little to no wind.

The fall is not the time to worry about or treat for summer annual weeds such as crabgrass. Those plants that are still alive will die with the first frost and the seed will not germinate until next spring when the weather warms back up again. However, you can treat now for winter annual weeds such as henbit, speedwell, and little barley. Once they have germinated this fall you can use a 2,4-D product, which can be achieved with a late October and into early November application for dandelions.

Remember, all of these chemical controls are pesticides and therefore need to be carefully considered and applied according to the label. Any material used to maintain a landscape, including fertilizer, sand, or pesticides, can end up in the storm sewer and lead to pollution of lakes, rivers, and streams. In the same manner, even our grass clippings and leaves can pollute our water supply. There are ways to manage our landscapes while reducing water pollution. The following will help when managing our lawns this fall:

  1. Any fertilizers, pesticides, and grass clippings should be swept back onto the landscape. Using a leaf blower will work as well. The idea is to keep these items on the greenscape rather than on the hardscape that leads easily to the storm sewer. Raking up leaves in the fall will also help reduce the amount of leaf debris that ends up in the water.
  2. Check your sprayers before using to ensure they are properly calibrated and the nozzles are not clogged.
  3. Compacted soils and thin turf do not allow fertilizers and pesticides to infiltrate the soil surface. Aerate and add organic matter to improve the composition of the soil to ensure these products do not run off of hard, compacted soils. Reseed bare areas of the lawn to catch lawn products.
  4. Thatch layers in the lawn can become a natural barrier to prevent infiltration. Aerate the lawn to reduce the thatch layer to allow lawn products to infiltrate their intended areas.

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Tips for Fall Plant Protections

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Fall has officially arrived. There have already been frost advisories for the western part of the state, so it won’t be long until frosts occur here. It is at this time that you need to think about care for your plants to protect them through the winter. Here is a ‘To Do’ list to prepare your lawn and garden for winter.

Care of newly planted trees should be considered. If it is a thin barked tree, add a tree wrap to protect it from sunscald. Sunscald is a condition that occurs during the winter with the rapid cool down at night of the cells in the trunk of the tree. The warm up can occur in the winter on warmer days but when night comes, those cells freeze and burst, causing damage to the trunk. Tree wraps will help protect young trees from this condition, but only leave the wrap on during the winter months and allow the trunk to be opened up during the summer to avoid damage from insects and disease.

tree wrapping

Tree Wrap

Young trees would also benefit from a fence around the tree to protect it from damage from rabbits and voles during the winter months. During the winter, these critters chew on the bark of our trees which causes wounds and, in some cases, girdles the tree leading to eventual death. A 2-foot high fence of chicken wire will be sufficient to protect your tree from both of these animals. Make sure the fence is dug into the ground a couple of inches so the voles can’t get under it.

Winter mulch can be applied when temperatures are consistently dropping down to the twenties each night. Winter mulch is the heavier layer of mulch we apply to plants like chrysanthemums and strawberries to keep them from having temperature fluxes in the soil they are planted in. Any plant that may be prone to frost heaving, the plant being pushed up out of the soil by a constant freeze and thaw condition. Plants that were just planted this fall could also benefit from winter mulching. This mulch can be up to twelve inches deep, which is much deeper than we usually advise but is needed for winter protection. It is better to use coarse wood chips, straw, or leaves for winter mulch rather than grass. Be sure to level the mulch back down to 2-3 inches in the spring.

Clean up all spent leaves of annual and perennial plants. Remove the dead plant material and compost it or dispose of it. If there was a problem with a disease or insect problem in the plant this summer, it would be best to dispose of it to reduce the problem with that insect or disease next year. Be sure to wait until the plants have turned brown in the fall before removing this plant material to allow them all the time available to build and store up sugars for next spring.

Now is the time to dig up your summer bulbs to prepare them for winter storage. Plants such as gladiolus, cannas, begonias, caladium, elephant ear and dahlia need to be dug up in the fall and stored indoors over the winter. They need to be dug up prior to a hard frost, or shortly after the first frost. Once the bulbs are removed from the ground, they need to be cleaned off, removing the leaves as you clean, and cure or dry them for 2-3 weeks. Then place the bulbs in crates or boxes, allowing for air flow. Store them throughout the winter in a cool, dark location such as a basement. Check the bulbs periodically through the winter to ensure no bulbs are starting to rot or mold.  If any do start to rot or mold, discard them immediately.

Aerating a lawn…

Lawn Aeration Blog

September is the beginning of our fall lawncare season. Overseeding or reseeding lawns can be done throughout the month and at the beginning of the month we can fertilize our lawns. Toward the end of the month, fall weed control can begin, but not until our temperatures cool off more. One of the other lawn activities that may be considered is lawn aeration.

Compacted soils can inhibit the growth of your grass. When a soil is compacted, the soil particles are packed too tightly together to allow oxygen and water to pass through the soil. This can lead to shallow roots for the grass plants and in turn, can lead to less drought tolerance. Compacted soils can also lead to more thatch build up on the soil surface.

Thatch is the accumulation of dead grass stems that don’t become decomposed. In compacted soils, earthworm activity decreases, as does the activity of other decomposing organisms. The reduction in decomposing organisms leads to the build-up of thatch which can cause problems with the growth of the lawn. Lawns with a high thatch layer can begin to die because the thatch layer repels water keeping it away from the roots of the grass plants.

One of the best ways to reduce thatch and alleviate soil compaction would be to aerate the lawn. Many people interchange the terms “power raking” and “core aerating” when it comes to lawn aeration. However, these are 2 very different activities. Power raking is a more intense form of reducing the thatch layer on the lawn. It is only recommended when a thatch layer is more than ½ inch because at that point it would be necessary to renovate a lawn rather than just to core aerate.

Aeration equipment

Core Aeration Equipment, Photo from John Fech, Nebraska Extension Educator

Core aeration is the method of aerating your lawn most recommended. This is the method where a machine is driven over the lawn while it pulls out many small, core soil samples throughout the lawn. These cores are laid over the top of the lawn but help by leaving holes in the soil surface for water and air to move in and they will fill back in. Core aeration will also sever the roots of the grass plants which stimulates the plants to grow new shoots to fill in the holes.

It is best to aerate a lawn in the spring or in the fall. This time of year is best because the plants can recover before winter or summer conditions that are sometimes difficult on our plants. It is also a good time of year to aerate due to the fact that the soil has more moisture in it than in the other dry months of the year. It is not recommended to aerate a lawn when it is too dry or too wet because it is more difficult to get the tines into the soil which can damage the plants more. It is not necessary to aerate your lawn every year, or sometimes at all. If your thatch layer starts to build up, you drive on the lawn a lot causing more compaction, or if the lawn begins to look thin, aeration can be done. At most, it would only be recommended to aerate a lawn every 3-5 years.

Where to plant a tree this fall…

Tree Siting Blog Article

It’s hard to believe that September is here already! With that, brings tree planting season. Fall is a great time to plant tree.

When planting your trees, remember to pay close attention to where you plant it to ensure that the tree can have a long, happy life in this new location. Often when we plant a tree, it is hard to visualize the full size of a tree, but remember, that small tree will grow into a much larger version. Plant the tree where it can spread its branches and live happily for many years to come.

When planting a new tree, think about what is all around the tree. Consider overhead powerlines, underground utilities, current buildings, any future construction that is planned, sidewalks, and the mature size of the tree.

When planting a tree, call the Digger’s Hotline at 811 to ensure there are no underground utilities near the location of tree planting. Remember, that the tree roots will grow, it would be best to give your tree plenty of space to grow without becoming too close to the powerlines to avoid future problems with the roots and the lines. If the utility company has to come in at any time to put in new lines this can damage the tree as well. Calling the Digger’s Hotline will also help so you don’t run into underground utility lines while you are planting. Never assume that the utility lines are deeper than you plan to dig.

Also, look at the above ground structures when you plant a new tree. Plant large trees at least 20 feet from a building to avoid damage to the building as the plant grows. Often, trees damage roofs, windows, and siding when the branches of the tree run into the building. If the tree won’t fit beside your home in the location you have picked, pick a different tree or a different planting location.

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Trees growing in powerlines, Photos from John Fech, Nebraska Extension

Pay close attention to the location of power lines when planting a new tree. Plant your trees 25 feet away from overhead power lines to avoid damage to the lines or to help the crews of our electrical companies from having to send a crew out to prune the trees in the lines. This doesn’t help them to have to do this pruning all the time and it is a detriment to the overall quality of the tree to have a “V” cut through the middle of the canopy to allow for the powerlines. Smaller, understory trees should be used under powerlines to help the men and women who work for our electric company.

Once you have completed this evaluation of the landscape, you can determine the size of the tree that can be planted and from that, you can decide what tree you would like to plant. Don’t forget to look around your yard and the yards of all of your neighbors. Don’t plant a Maple if everyone else on the street has one in their front yard, pick something else. There are a lot of great trees that do very well in Nebraska environments but are not used enough such as Shagbark Hickory, Sweetgum, Pawpaw, and even a Linden.

This information came from the Nebraska Forest Service.

Fungi in the Landscape

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Everyone loves a nice-looking landscape. However, sometimes unique structures appear in our landscape for seemingly no reason. Fungi can form in the lawn or on our plants. Sometimes these fungal structures look very unappealing, but that may be the only problem. However, there are times when these structures can be a sign of more problems with our plants.

Trees often develop different types of fungi on them. Some fungi develop as a green or whitish mold-like formation on the bark of the tree. This is not damaging to the tree. However, there are fungal formations on trees that can a sign of more damage to the tree. Conks or shelf fungi can form on the branches and trunks of our trees and look like shelves growing out of the tree. When you see a conk, you are seeing the outward formation of interior decay in the tree. Conks are indicators that your tree needs to be removed in the near future because the tree is decaying on the inside and therefore not as sturdy as it once was. If you have a tree with conks and would like to know if it should be removed, have a Certified Arborist inspect the tree.

Puffballs and mushrooms are commonly found in lawns. Both of these structures are fungal formations growing off of some type of decaying organic matter within the soil. They have no roots, stems, leaves, flowers, or seeds like plants do. They have no chlorophyll which is why they are not green and why they cannot produce their own food. Mushrooms found in a lawn are most likely not edible. If you are not sure about a mushroom, do NOT eat it. There are a lot of poisonous mushrooms found that can cause severe illness and even death, it is best to avoid eating if you are not 100% sure of the mushroom.

Puffballs are the large round structures that have no stalk to hold them up off the ground. When they mature or are struck by a raindrop or kicked, the puffball opens up to spread the spores to new areas. Puffballs are common in the late summer to early fall. Mushrooms are the formations found in your lawns and gardens that do have a stalk to hold them up off the ground. Mushrooms look like an umbrella and are often found where a tree is or was recently removed as they live on the roots of the tree or the decaying roots of the dead trunk. Mushrooms are found in moist environments such as during rainy spring months or in an irrigated lawn.

Dog vomit fungus

Dog Vomit Fungus on landscape mulch

We also see many types of slime molds in the landscape. Slime molds typically show up on mulch in our gardens and can take on many different appearances. One of the best named slime molds would be the dog-vomit fungus which looks just as the name implies. There are also yellow, gray, white, off-white, orange, and brick red slime molds. All slime molds are aesthetic issues and cause no problems to your plants. If they bother you, they can be sprayed off the mulch with a strong spray of water.

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Stinkhorn fungus in a landscape

Stinkhorns are another type of fungus we may find growing in the mulch around our flowers. Stinkhorns are small, pink stalks sticking up out of the ground with a brown, slimy cap similar to the cap on a mushroom. Stinkhorns are so named because of the unpleasant odor they can have. This is another type of fungus that causes no harm to the plants and doesn’t need to be removed.

For fungi in the landscape, there is no method of control other than hand-removal. They are either not harmful to our plants or they are just showing us the demise of the plant that is already happening.

Storm Damage to Trees

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This time of year, storms tend to sneak up on us, as we saw last Friday night. Unfortunately, some of those storms can be severe and cause damage to us, our homes, our vehicles, and even our trees. When storms bring strong winds, hail, and tornadoes, these things can all do different kinds of damage to our trees. Cleanup doesn’t end with the branches on the ground.

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If heavy winds come and break branches, those breaks need to be cleaned up to a good pruning cut to allow the plant to seal up the wound. If the storm broke the top out of the tree, it would be a good idea to get a Certified Arborist in to look at the damage to determine if the tree can be salvaged. Allow the Arborist to do the pruning because there are methods that can be done to start a new leader in the tree to help it fill back in and continue to grow upward.

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In addition to branches breaking, some of these trees may have even had bark ripped all the way down the trunk of the tree. When trees have open wounds that are large, it takes a long time for the tree to seal up that location, if it can ever be done. This is a great location for insects and diseases to come into the trees and cause secondary effects on the trees. Unfortunately, there is nothing that can be done to “fix” this type of wound. It is best to just leave it alone and let it heal on its own. You can remove excess bark that is hanging off the tree, but don’t paint or wrap the wound with anything, this can hinder the sealing process of the tree.

Hail can cause damage to the leaves and bark of our trees. If your trees leaves look ragged and ripped due to hail, it is mostly aesthetic damage. The leaves are still on the tree and able to produce sugars through photosynthesis for the trees so it isn’t as damaging as it looks. Damage to the bark on the trunk and on the branches can be more problematic, unfortunately there is nothing that can fix this but time. You will always have round-to-oval shaped wounds where hail hit the tree, but over time the tree will seal these wounds and it won’t be too problematic. If there are a lot of large hail wounds to a small tree, it might be the demise, but give it time to see if it pulls through. For a second opinion have a Certified Arborist look at the tree.

Some trees were uprooted in these high winds. According to John Fech, Kathleen Cue, and Graham Herbst from Douglas-Sarpy County Extension, the younger the tree is, the more chance it has to survive storm damage that caused it to lean. If the tree is 0-5 years old, it has a good chance to survive leaning and should be staked as soon as possible, as long as it is not closely located to people or property. If the tree is 5-10 years old and is leaning, there is a 50 percent chance that the tree will survive. Consult a certified arborist to determine the survivability of that tree, as the degree of lean is what will cause the tree to live or die. If the tree is more than 10 years old and is leaning, it becomes a hazardous tree. If that tree is in an area where it is in close proximity to people or properties, it should definitely be removed. However, if this tree is on an acreage or farmstead and is further away from people or property, it may be able to survive in that location, but a certified arborist should still be consulted to know for sure.

Tree Galls

Spring is a great time of year. We can enjoy spending time outdoors with our friends and family and enjoy the views throughout our landscape. However, that view is sometimes interrupted by weird formations that show up on our tree leaves which are called galls. The good thing about galls is that they are not harmful to our trees, they are just displeasing to the eye.

Galls are commonly seen on many of our tree species. A gall is a deformation on the plant usually caused by an insect but they can be caused by fungi, bacteria, and other organisms. Galls can form on the leaves or on the branches but it is developed as a result of the feeding activity of the insect or mite that then lives inside the gall.

One of the most common types of galls is the Hackberry nipple gall which forms on the underside of the leaf of hackberry trees. This is a very common gall, in fact, it occurs so often that it can almost be used as an identification characteristic of the Hackberry tree. In the fall, the psyllids, or tiny black insects, come out of these galls to mate and often become a nuisance insect in our homes. They are so small that they can get through our window screens and enter our homes to fly around and pester our families.

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Photo of Hackberry Nipple Gall by Sarah Browning, Lancaster County Extension

Another common gall that we are seeing right now is the bladder gall on Maples. This particular gall is caused by a mite. The signs we see from this insect feeding on our trees would be small, bright pink bumps on the top side of the leaves.

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Photo of Maple Bladder Gall

Oaks also get a couple of galls. There is a leaf gall that is fairly common among oak trees called the oak apple gall which is a large, round, tan-colored gall on the leaves. It is a growth filled with a spongy center and contains one wasp larvae in the middle. Bur oaks commonly get a bullet gall which grows all over the branches of bur oak trees. These galls appear as marble-sized, tan, hard structures attached to the branches of the tree. The bullet gall, which is caused by a parasitic wasp, is generally not harmful to the tree, but if the infestation gets very high, it can cause branch dieback.

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Oak Bullet Gall

Cottonwoods get a petiole-leaf gall. This gall is caused by an aphid and is a puffy ball located at the base of the leaf where it meets the petiole, or the stem-like structure that attaches the leaf to the branch of the tree. The petiole-leaf gall will contain many small aphids later in the season that will not harm the tree.

These insect galls are generally not harmful to the tree. They mainly cause aesthetic damage and don’t affect the health or longevity of the tree. There is no way to control the gall insects once the galls appear on the tree and prevention is difficult and not recommended.

Part of the information for this article came from an article written by Mary Jane Frogge, a UNL Extension Associate from Lancaster County Extension.

Peach Leaf Curl

Lately, I have had quite a few community members come into the office with a problem on their peach tree. The leaves look funny and have a pinkish color to them. The same problem is being seen throughout the area and unfortunately, there is nothing we can do about it, at least not for this year. The problem many people are dealing with is Peach Leaf Curl.

Peach leaf curl is caused by the fungus Taphrina deformans. This fungal disease is one of the most common diseases in the home orchard and can affect the blossoms, fruit, leaves, and shoots of peaches and nectarines. (Cherries have a similar leaf curl diseases caused by T. cerasi.) Peach leaf curl is more severe following cool, wet springs; temperatures between 50 and 70 degrees F are ideal for infection, which is why we are seeing it so often this year.

Peach Leaf Curl, Paul Bachi, Univ of Kentucky R and E Center, Bugwood

Photo of Peach Leaf Curl is from Paul Bachi, University of Kentucky Research and Education Center, Bugwood.org

The primary symptom is a thickened, puckered area on leaves which will turn yellow to red or purple with the loss of chlorophyll. These leaves may prematurely drop, weakening the tree and making it more susceptible to other diseases, pests, and cold injury. The disease can also result in reduced fruit set, size, and quality.

A single fungicide spray applied while trees are still dormant (just prior to bud swell), thoroughly covering all branches, shoots, and buds will control peach leaf curl. Effective controls include Bravo, Ziram, and copper compounds.

At this time of year, most infection has already occurred, and fungicide sprays are relatively ineffective. Fruit on defoliated trees should be thinned to reduce stress and improve tree survival.

This information on Peach Leaf Curl came from Connie Fisk, a fruit tree expert for Nebraska Extension located in Cass County. Read more from Connie on her blog, Food Adventures with Connie

Another thing to think about this time of year, is what type of fruit tree to plant if you are thinking about planting new trees. You need to decide what type of fruit you prefer to grow, what you will be using your fruit for, and if the tree is self-fruitful or if you need to plant a pollinator tree nearby. It is also best to plant fruit trees that are resistant to the common diseases found in our fruit trees. For apple trees, select a tree that is resistant to cedar-apple rust and apple scab. For peach trees, choose a tree that is resistant to bacterial spot. For pear trees, choose one that is resistant to Fire Blight.

apples-A. Henneman flickr

Flickr image courtesy of Alice Henneman per CC license

For Apple trees, some good choices include Redfree, Johnafree, or Liberty. For Pear varieties, look at Moonglow, Luscious, Lincoln, Magness, or Seckel. For Peaches, choose Reliance, Red Haven, Contender, or Madison.

There are many other great choices for fruit tree varieties to use. Nebraska Extension released a NebGuide in July of 2016 called ‘Fruit Tree Cultivars for Nebraska’. It is a good guide that helps you to find the fruit tree variety or varieties you need for your fruiting wishes.

Tree Selection and Pruning

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Arbor Day is Friday, April 28th, 2017. Arbor Day is always an exciting day for me because I really appreciate trees and understand the real potential that can come from planting a tree. With Pine Wilt and the concerns of Emerald Ash Borer creeping closer it seems there is always a need to plant a tree, if not for you, then for future generations.

There are a lot of good trees to plant when you do plant a tree. The most important thing to remember when planting trees, is Diversity. When you go to purchase your tree, look around your yard and even your neighborhood. Try to avoid planting multiple trees of the same species, genus, or family of plants in the neighborhood and in your own landscape. You may enjoy Maples, but you want to make sure you plant other types of trees in your yard besides just maples to help avoid an issue that may arise should another pest come through like what we saw with Dutch Elm Disease or Chestnut Blight or now Emerald Ash Borer.

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Each year, ReTree Nebraska comes out with a new diverse list of trees that grow well in Nebraska and are often under-utilized. That list includes Baldcypress, Catalpa, Kentucky Coffeetree, Elm Hybrids, Hackberry, American Linden, Sugar Maple, Chinkapin Oak, Bur Oak, English Oak, Sycamore, Shantung Maple, Miyabe Maple, Gample Oak, Tree Lilac, Concolor Fir, Black Hills Spruce, and Ponderosa Pine. In 2017, ReTree Nebraska added Turkish Filbert including other nut trees such as Hickory, Chestnut, Pecan, Buckeye, and Walnut to the list of good trees to plant in Nebraska. There are a lot of other great trees to use in your landscape, this is just a short list.

Turkish Filbert is a unique, under-utilized tree in Nebraska. It grows up to 40-50 feet tall and 30-50 feet wide. It has large, bright green leaves that turn yellow in the fall. This tree has catkin flowers, like a cottonwood.  It has edible nuts that are produced in a cluster of 3-6 and have a spiny husk that covers the nuts. Often squirrels eat the nuts, but they can be roasted and eaten by humans. This tree is most commonly used as a shade tree or a specimen tree in a landscape.

Another thing to think about with our young trees, is pruning. Eric Berg, a community forester from the Nebraska Forest Service wrote a great article on pruning young trees. We need to start pruning our trees when they are young to minimize tree wounding and cause the trees to grow stronger, mature growth. A tree planted in a landscape setting, rather than being planted in a forested area, will grow out more than up and not develop a strong central leader. Often our trees develop multiple leaders that lead to weak growth that can easily be broken in storms. We saw the damage from weak branch attachments and poor growth in our ice storm this past winter.

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Photo courtesy of Kim Todd, UNL Department of Agronomy and Horticulture

We can prune a tree when it is young to help prevent some damage in future storms. If you would like to learn more about pruning young trees, Graham Herbst, from the Nebraska Forest Service, will be in Beatrice to teach us about pruning young trees on Monday, June 19th from 6-8 pm starting at the Gage County Extension Office. He will cover how to set pruning objectives, determining a pruning cycle and dose, strategies for specific trees, and how to execute your plan with proper cuts. There will also be a hands-on pruning demonstration at the end of the classroom portion. If you are interested in this program, please call the Gage County Extension Office at 402-223-1384 to sign up.

Which Herbicide to use…

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Photo by Nic Colgrove

Spring is coming. And with the onset of warm weather and more spring rains, comes many different lawn weeds. Each year we tend to find new herbicides in the garden center of our favorite stores. However, when dealing with pesticides, it is very important to know what you are purchasing and how to correctly use it so as to not harm the environment, pollinators, and beneficial plants.

One of the things we all need to remember when using pesticides is to use the right product for the job and to know what you are using. To use the trade name Roundup isn’t going to be enough anymore. There are a lot of new Roundup brand products that each have a different combination of chemicals.

Roundup 365 is a new product from Scotts that contains both glyphosate, which is the active ingredient in the general Roundup product, as well as Imazapic. Imazapic is a selective herbicide used to control annual and perennial grasses as well as some broadleaf weeds. It has a trait that allows it to last longer in the soil than a regular glyphosate product which is essentially deactivated when it hits the soil. In accordance with the label, Roundup 365 should only be used in cracks and crevices in sidewalks, driveways, walkways, and tennis courts, amongst patios and paths, along fences, foundations, curbs, retaining walls, and landscape borders, and in gravel areas and parking areas. It is not to be used in areas where planting or seeding will occur for the next year or in the root zone of plants or in any other garden setting where desired plants are. Also, be careful when applying this to fenced areas as it should not be applied where there are desired plants on the other side of the fence that could be damaged with the application of this product.

Roundup for Lawns is another new product made by Scotts that actually contains no glyphosate. Roundup for Lawns contains MCPA, Quinclorac, Dicamba, and Sulfentrazone. MCPA is a herbicide similar to 2,4-D for broadleaf weeds. Quinclorac is a post-emergent crabgrass and annual grass herbicide. Sulfentrazone is the active ingredient found in Sedgehammer that is often used on yellow nutsedge. Dicamba is one of the 3 active ingredients in Trimec that is used for broadleaf weed control in a lawn. This product can be used over an established lawn because it has no ingredients that will kill established turfgrass.

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*Reference to commercial products or trade names is made with the understanding that no discrimination is intended of those not mentioned and no endorsement by University of Nebraska–Lincoln Extension is implied for those mentioned.

Dicamba is a pesticide that we should be very careful with, as well as any pesticide that contains dicamba which includes Roundup for Lawns and Trimec. Dicamba can turn into a gas and move to non-target plants as a vapor in temperatures of 85 degrees and above. This volatilization can occur for the day and even a couple of days after application. So Dicamba products shouldn’t be used in the summer months. Also, be very careful with Dicamba products in your lawn around trees and shrubs. This product can cause injury to these plants when it moves through the soil and comes into contact with the roots. Limit use of this product to no more than twice per growing season around tree roots to avoid injury.

Each of these Roundup products are labeled for different uses. So, make sure that you always read and follow the label instructions provided with the product to ensure that you are using the product correctly and so that you don’t harm the environment or any non-target plants. Always keep the label and product instructions with the product so you will always know how and where to properly apply it.

*Reference to commercial products or trade names does not imply endorsement by Nebraska Extension or bias against those not mentioned.