Yard and Garden: April 12, 2019

Yard & Garden blog, 2019

This is the Q&A for the Yard and Garden show for April 12, 2019. Yard and Garden Live is a call-in radio show I do on KUTT 99.5 FM from 10-11:30 am and it will run through August 2, 2019. It can also be found on kutt995.com for online listening. If you missed a show or just want to read through the questions, I have written them all in my blog and will continue to do so throughout the season.

Guest Host: Stacy Adams, Associate Professor of Practice, UNL Department of Agronomy & Horticulture

1. The first caller of the show recently purchased a tree at a box store. Can it be planted now or should she wait?

A. If the tree is not leafed out yet, it would be fine to plant it outdoors. However if it is leafed out, like it turns out this tree is, it would be better to wait and put it in a shed or garage for a few more days to get through the cold nights we are supposed to face this weekend. Next week it should warm up to the 70’s and would be find to plant this tree outdoors.

2. This caller just recently moved into a new house. The yard at this house seems to have been neglected for a while and it is full of weeds. What is the best way to renovate this lawn? Should it be all killed and started again?

A. It would be better to just renovate what is existing rather than killing off the entire lawn and starting from bare soil. When the soil remains bare as new seed is started, many weeds will find their way back into the yard. A good way to renovate would be to aerate now and follow the aeration with an overseeding to improve the density of the lawn to help out compete weeds. When overseeding, a starter fertilizer can be used, there is one that contains mesotrione, a herbicide commonly known as Tenacity. This mesotrione will help combat the weeds and not harm the new seedlings. Then, in the fall, aerate and overseed again to help thicken up the lawn more. Next spring, crabgrass control can be used. Over time, the lawn will improve and weeds will begin to be reduced in population.

3. A caller has ash trees with holes in the trunk, mainly at the base of the tree. The holes are very small, maybe 1/16″. What is causing this damage? Is it Emerald Ash Borer? Can he save the trees?

A. These holes are too small to be Emerald Ash Borers (EAB). The holes for EAB are 1/8″ and they are D-shaped. With EAB, it is more likely that the damage and holes would start at the top of the tree and move their way back down the tree rather than just at the base of the tree like these holes are. This size of hole could be from a Bark Beetle. These are tiny beetles that can damage the cambium layer of our trees. Bark beetles can easily be controlled with a tree and shrub systemic insecticide containing Imidacloprid, which is common in the Merit products. For more information on the different types of insect damage, visit this page from the Nebraska Forest Service

bark beetle damage, whitney cranshaw, Colorado state Univ, bugwood
Bark Beetle damage, Photo from Whitney Cranshaw, Colorado State University, Bugwood.org

4. When is the best time to plant poppies and where should they be planted? She purchased seed and would like to plant it.

A. Poppies germinate best in cool soil temperatures, so anytime now would be a good time to get the seed spread. They need full sun, so place them in a garden that receives at least 6 hours of sunlight per day. Click Here for more information on growing poppies.

5. A caller has buffalograss growing, but it is fairly thin. What can be done to thicken it up?

A. Overseeding or adding new plugs will help to thicken the buffalograss. However, this is a warm season grass species so it should be seeded or plugged in later May to June. Fertilize should be added in the summer months as well, do not fertilize in the spring or fall when the plants should be going dormant. This guide will help, it is a Buffalograss Lawn Calendar from the UNL Turf Department.

6. The last caller of the day has Iris that was transplanted from her grandmother’s plants 15 years ago. She will now be moving sometime this summer how can she transplant these iris’ to ensure they live?

A. The best time to move Iris’ would be in the fall, but it can be done in the spring. Since you haven’t purchased the new home or sold this home, they can’t be moved now. It could be written into the purchase agreement that you can dig those up when the time is correct in September. If not, you can develop a nursery type of location. Dig them up now and put them into a cat box on the North side of the house at the new location until the fall planting time. For this spring, it would help to pamper the plants to help them with the move. Keep them watered through the year and fertilize them and cut off the flower stems before they set seed to help them put energy into the rest of the plant rather than seed production. If you have to move them in the summer, just make sure you keep them well watered.

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