Yard and Garden: July 20, 2018

Y&G Blog Photo, 2018

This is the Q&A for the Yard and Garden show for July 20, 2018. Yard and Garden Live is a call-in radio show I do on KUTT 99.5 FM from 10-11:30 am and it will run through August 3, 2018. It can also be found on kutt995.com for online listening. If you missed a show or just want to read through the questions, I have written them all in my blog and will continue to do so throughout the season.

Guest Host: John Porter, Urban Agriculture Program Coordinator for UNL Extension and Nebraska College of Technical Agriculture (NCTA)

1. The first caller of the day has holes in her yard that are 1-1.5 inches across. Is this ground squirrels? How can she control them?

A. This does sound like damage from ground squirrels. Ground squirrels can be controlled through trapping, baits, or toxicants. For more information on controlling ground squirrels, visit this guide from UNL Wildlife.

2. This caller has Virginia creeper that is having some issues. The first set of leaves have rust spots and holes on them and the new leaves are showing up but the buds are not opening. This plant is growing in part sun. What is wrong with it?

A. This could be a fungus on the leaves of the Virginia creeper that is leaving a shot-hole appearance behind when the dead areas of the fungus get dry and brittle and fall out of the leaf. If it is a fungus a copper fungicide or chlorothalonil to control it. There could also be some heat stress occurring causing the new leaves to not open up. There is also a possibility that herbicide drift has also occurred that has caused the leaves to not open up.

Harlequin Bug, Alton N Sparks, Jr, Univ of GA, Bugwood

Harlequin Bug photo from Alton N. Sparks, Jr., University of Georgia, Bugwood.org

3. A caller has horseradish with bugs on it that are beetle-like and are black with orange spots on them. What are these bugs and how can they be controlled?

A. These are most likely Harlequin bugs. They can be found on horseradish and they can do a great deal of damage. Harlequin bugs are a true bug, like a stink bug, They suck the juices out of the leaves of our plants leaving them wilted and discolored. They can be managed with the pesticide sevin.

4. A walk-in listener works with the football field in town. They have brown spots throughout the field and have found some caterpillars and a large amount of tiny, worm-like creatures. What are these? What is causing the brown spots? How can these problems be solved?

A. These caterpillars are sod webworm. They are a pest of turf. These caterpillars can cause brown spots in the lawn. Triazicide is labeled for sod webworms and would give pretty quick knockdown. The worm-like creatures found on the lawn could be nematodes or they could be fungus gnat larvae. Fungus gnat larvae rarely cause serious damage outside.

5. This caller is having difficulty with tomatoes ripening. What is the problem?

A. The hot weather is causing poor pollination. The pigments responsible for the red color in our tomatoes are not produced when the temperatures exceed 85 degrees. So, when we see long stretches of very hot weather, our tomatoes will not ripen. Be patient, they will ripen eventually when the very hot temperatures recede.

6. A caller is having problems with weeds in his asparagus. Will preen work now to control the weeds? Also, does he need to water his asparagus in the winter months because his asparagus isn’t growing very well.

A. Preen should be applied in the spring to control annual weeds, it will not do anything to control weeds that are already growing in your asparagus. At this point, hand pulling and applying a layer of mulch would be the best option for managing the weeds in the asparagus. When the asparagus is cut back this fall or before it begins to grow in the spring, glyphosate (Roundup) can be used to control the weeds. The glyphosate product can be used directly over the asparagus patch as long as no green from the asparagus is growing above the ground. Then, apply a layer of preen (make sure it is labeled for use in the asparagus) and add the layer of mulch.

Bagworm4

Bagworm

7. The last caller of the day has bagworms in their windbreak. The bags are 1-1.5 inches in length. What should they do about these?

A. Pesticide sprays for bagworms are not going to be as effective now. It is better to control the bagworms from when they hatch until they are up to 1 inch in length. Spraying a chemical now would kill some, but the rate would not be nearly as effective as before. It might be better to just handpick the ones you can reach and watch for it next year to be able to spray sooner in the season when it is more effective.

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