Yard and Garden: April 27, 2018

Y&G Blog Photo, 2018

This is the Q&A for the Yard and Garden show for April 27, 2018. Yard and Garden Live is a call-in radio show I do on KUTT 99.5 FM from 10-11:30 am and it will run through August 3, 2018. It can also be found on kutt995.com for online listening. If you missed a show or just want to read through the questions, I have written them all in my blog and will continue to do so throughout the season.

Guest Host: Dick Campbell, Owner of Campbell’s Nursery in Lincoln

1.The first caller of the show wants to plant hydrangea’s on the south side of a porch. Will they grow well in that location?

A. Most hydrangeas like part shade and wouldn’t grow as well in a location of south sun. However, ‘Limelight’ and ‘Little Lime’ would be good selections for full sun. The ‘Little Lime’ hydrangea will only grow up to 3 feet tall while ‘Limelight’ will grow up to 6-8 feet tall.

2. A walk-in listener has a 12 year old boxwood that is turning whitish-brown throughout most of the plant. What, if anything, can be done to save the plant?

A. This could be boxwood blight or winter desiccation. The fact that the boxwoods started to turn brown in the summer makes it less likely that it is winter desiccation. Also, the plant is brown and dead throughout the majority of the center of the plant, where winter desiccation typically only shows up on the top and outer sides where wind directly hits the plant. Either way, too much of the shrub has become dead branches so it should be removed. Boxwoods can be replanted into the area where the blight was a problem previously with no harm to the new plants.

3. A caller has Dwarf Alberta Spruce trees that have brown spots on them. Last summer he sprayed the plants with a copper fungicide, but should something else be done to them?

A. Dwarf Alberta spruce is prone to problems with spider mites in the summer months. If it is spider mites, when they start becoming active again, they can be killed with a strong spray of water. The bigger problem is that this is a very slow growing tree and it may never fill in again where the dead areas have appeared in the trees.

4. This caller has pecan trees that the top has died back on them over the winter. Can he prune it out and maintain the trees?

A. Give the trees time to leaf out this summer to know for sure where the dieback is found through the tree. With the cooler spring this year, many of our plants are slow to come out of their dormancy. Wait until the tree is fully out of dormancy before pruning it. After it has leafed out fully, cut the dead areas out, but cut back to a bud at the top of the tree so that you can use that bud to reestablish a new leader.

5. A caller has underground irrigation and planted a new lawn via seed and some via sod last fall. What type of watering schedule should he be on now?

A. Because this lawn was established last fall, you would not need to keep up the same schedule as last fall, the roots should be established now. Wait to start up the irrigation after spring rains begin. 1 inch of water per week would be the recommendation now, that is what established lawns require, so it would be the same for this lawn. Most often, we give our lawns 1 inch of water per week through 3 irrigation cycles of 1/3 inch each time. Make sure you check your irrigation rates when you first turn your system on for the year.

6. This caller has a 25-30 foot tall red oak in his yard. Every year for the past 2-3 years, the leaves come out cupped and small and stay that way through the entire growing season. What is wrong with his tree? He has other oaks in his yard that don’t look like this.

A. The cupping leaves sounds similar to herbicide drift. Typically, though, the trees will grow more leaves later in the season that are not cupped. If this was herbicide damage, it is likely that all the oaks in the yard would have this problem, but it still could be herbicide damage. It could also be from a small mite or other insect that is sucking the juices out of the leaves as they emerge. It would be best to bring a sample to the show or to Nicole to take to the lab for further testing. If it is herbicide damage, multiple years with damage to a tree can start to stress and kill a tree.

2018-04-20 12.52.00

Henbit blooming

7. A caller has a zoysiagrass lawn that is full of henbit for the first time this year. Is there anything to do for that now?

A. Henbit is blooming for the year now, which means it is already setting seed for more henbit to grow there next year. Henbit is a winter annual that germinates in the fall, goes dormant over the winter, then comes up in the spring and flowers and produces seed before it dies with the summer warmth. Because it is getting so late in the year and the seed is already there, there is no reason to treat for henbit now. It will die soon, once the temperatures warm up. next fall, treat with a 2,4-D product in October or November to kill it as it first germinates in the fall.

8. How do you control Creeping Charlie in the lawn?

A. Creeping Charlie is best controlled in the fall months with a 2,4-D product or a product containing Triclopyr. It is best to do 2 applications in the fall, one in the middle of September and another at the end of October. The caller was going to overseed, so it was advised to overseed this spring and then treat the Creeping Charlie in the fall for best control. It will take multiple years of treatments to fully reduce or eradicate Creeping Charlie, but spraying in the fall will start knocking it back.

9. This caller has Sod that was installed last November and now some cracks have shown up between the sections of the turf. What can be done to fix that?

A. Add some soil to those areas of bare ground and then reseed those areas. Cover the new seed with peat moss while it establishes to keep it moist.

10. A caller wants to know how to plant strawberries and what varieties are good choices?

A. Sarah Browning, Lancaster County Extension, has written a good article on Planting a Strawberry Bed

11. The last caller of the day wanted to know if they should till their garden before planting and when to prune her hydrangea shrub?

A. If the soil is loose and has a good level of nutrients, you wouldn’t have to till it first. It might be a good idea to till it first to loosen it up and to add nutrients back into the soil for better production.

As for the hydrangea, this is a late summer blooming hydrangea, so it can be pruned now and still produce flower blooms for August or September this year. It can be pruned back to the ground if it is overgrown. If it is not too overgrown, the largest canes can just be cut out of the plant, leaving the more productive, smaller canes in the plant to grow.

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