Yard and Garden: July 3, 2015

Yard and Garden Green LogoThis is the Q&A for the Yard and Garden show for July 3, 2015. Yard and Garden Live is a call-in radio show I do on KUTT 99.5 FM from 10-11:30 am and it will run through July 31, 2015. It can also be found on kutt995.com for online listening. If you missed a show or just want to read through the questions, I have written them all in my blog and will continue to do so throughout the season.

Guest Host: Julie Albrecht, Professor in Health and Nutrition Sciences at UNL

1. A caller had a Bradford Pear tree with brown limbs on approximately 1/4 of the tree. What would be causing that?

A: This is probably due to fireblight which has been very common in many of our fruit trees this year, including pear and crabapple. If that is the case, prune out the infected limbs by cutting 6-8 inches behind the change in color on the branch from brown to black. Dip pruners into bleach water between each cut to reduce the spread of the disease through the tree.

2. The first caller also has moles in her yard, how can she control them?

A: Moles can be controlled by trapping. Find an active run by tapping the mounds down a few times prior to placing the trap in the run. If the mound returns each time it is knocked back into the hole, it is active and the mole will come back after the trap is set. For more information see the Moles publication from the Internet Center for Wildlife Damage Management.

3. A caller has a pond that has a lot of moss. How can this be controlled?

A: Copper Sulfate Crystals will work best on algae/moss. It is best if it is applied when the growth first becomes visible.

Photo by Howard F. Schwartz, Colorado State University, Bugwood.org

Nutsedge Photo by Howard F. Schwartz, Colorado State University, Bugwood.org

4. A gentleman wanted to know how to control nutsedge?

A: The best control for nutsedge is Sedgehammer, a product that is specific to sedges. It needs to be reapplied throughout the growing season to small plantings before they produce new nutlets that will produce more plants.

5. A gentleman has an ash tree that has many shriveled leaves with insects on the underside of the leaves. What can he do to control these insects?

A: These are probably lacebugs or aphids. Use a general insecticide such as sevin, eight, or malathion to control these insects on the ash tree. Lacebugs and aphids suck the juices out of the tree which will cause discoloration and curling leaves.

6. A lady has tomatoes that are curling and shriveling, she didn’t notice any insects or spots on the leaves. What would be causing this?

A: This could be possibly a virus or 2,4-D drift. If it is herbicide drift, the plants will grow out of it eventually and the new growth should be normal. If it is a virus there is no cure and the plant will continue to grow abnormally.

7. A lady has a mandevilla plant that has leaves that are turning yellow with spots. What would cause this problem?

A: This could be due to environmental factors such as high moisture early in the growing season or due to a fungal leaf spot. Ensure that the plant is getting the correct amount of moisture at all times. Use a fungicide on the plant to help with a fungal disease, Daconil is a good choice for fungicide.

8. A gentleman is curious about vegetable preservation techniques. Do you have to blanch all vegetables that you will be freezing and will you lose nutrients when you blanch these vegetables?

A: Blanching is necessary for all vegetables to stop growth and stop enzyme production that can cause the vegetables to lose flavor. Blanching also helps maintain the freshness and color in your vegetables. Blanching only needs to be done for a very short period of time, followed by plunging the produce into ice water to stop the cooking process. After it is drained, the vegetables can be put into freezer bags for freezing. For more information regarding food preservation, visit the National Center for Home Food Preservation for the safest recommended procedures for food preservation.

9. A lady has some trees that have been planted in the past couple of years and now it looks as if something has come and eat the top off of the trees. Now there is suckering at the base of the plant. What would have chewed on these trees and can those suckers be used to grow a new tree?

A: Deer is likely the culprit for chewing off the trees. The best control for deer would be to add some type of fencing to exclude deer from the trees. The suckers are coming up at the base of the plant because the top has likely died back which forced the trees to produce suckers for new growth. The suckers may be weak or not grow straight, but with additional help a new tree may be able to regrow from the suckers. It might be best for new trees to be planted for best growth and strongest trees.

10. A caller dug out their pond and moved some of the soil to a garden spot. The vegetables growing there are growing but have no fruits on them. What would cause this?

A: This is likely due to high nitrogen that came from the soil at the bottom of the lake. Nitrogen is a nutrient that will cause green leafy growth that can sometimes suppress vegetable production. I would suggest a soil test to determine what to do with the garden to help production improve.

Roseslug Collage

Photo on the left of the roseslug on the underside of the leaf, Photo on the right of the damage from roseslugs

11. A caller has roseslugs on his roses. They have destroyed about 80% of the leaves on the plant. What can be done about this?

A: If a roseslug population is low, control is not necessary. However, this sounds excessive so a controlling spray with a general insecticide such as Eight will work for these roseslugs. Be careful to not spray the rose flowers to reduce impact on pollinator insects.

12. When is the best time to transplant Iris’?

A: Fall is the best time for transplanting Iris and Peonies. Transplanting now would be difficult because when they get moved they have limited roots and in the hot, dry part of the summer it would be hard to keep the plants hydrated enough to keep it alive.

13. A caller has cherry trees that have much of the cherry crop as rotten fruits hanging on the trees. What would cause this?

A: This is brown rot, it is a fungal disease that is common in cherry trees this year due to the wet spring. There is no control for it at this time. Fungicides should be applied early in the spring to prevent this disease.

14. A caller has a cherry tree that one side of it has died. What has caused this problem? He did have some damage occur to the trees a few years ago due to cattle foraging through the area.

A: The cattle likely injured the bark of the tree causing it to get a canker on the trunk. The canker would cause a disruption in the flow of water and nutrients throughout the tree. There is no cure for the canker. He can try to prune out the dead branches and see if it will come out of it in the next couple of years.

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